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Understanding batch chemical processes modelling and case studies Thokozani Majozi, Esmael R. Seid, Jui - Yuan Lee

By: Majozi, Thokozani [autor]
Contributor(s): Lee, Jui-Yuan [autor] | Seid, Esmael Reshid [autor]
Publisher: United States of America CRC Press 2017Description: xvii, 312 páginas Illustrations, figures, table 24 cmContent type: Media type: Carrier type: ISBN: 9781498773171Subject(s): Agroquímica | Industria farmacéutica | Procesos químicosDDC classification: 660.2812
Contents:
Introduction to batch processes. - - Modelling for effective solutions: reduction of binary variables. - - Methods to reduce computational time: prediction of time points. - - Integration of scheduling and heat integration: minimization of energy requirements. - - Heat integration in multipurpose batch plants. - - Design and synthesis of heat-integrated batch plants using an effective technique. - - Simultaneous scheduling and water optimization: reduction of effluent in batch facilities. - - Optimization of energy and water use in multipurpose batch plants using an improved mathematical formulation. - - Targeting for long-term time horizons: water optimization. - - Long-term heat integration in multipurpose batch plants using heat storage.
Summary: Batch chemical processes are always ideal in the manufacture of small-volume, high-value-added products, as traditionally encountered in pharmaceutical,agrochemical and food and beverage industries. The main distinción between these processes and their continuous counterparts pertains to the handling of time. Continuous operations can attain steady state, wherein time is completely overridden, whereas batch operations are never at steady state. This simply implies that time can never be ignored in the analysis of batch processes. Consequently, the synthesis, design and optimization of these operations should embed time as a critical dimension.
List(s) this item appears in: Ingeniería Química
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Colección general 660.2812 M234 (Browse shelf) 2017 1 Available 0000056495
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Batch chemical processes, so often employed in the pharmaceutical and agrochemical fields, differ significantly from standard continuous operations in the emphasis upon time as a critical factor in their synthesis and design.</p> <p>With this inclusive guide to batch chemical processes, the author introduces the reader to key aspects in mathematical modeling of batch processes and presents techniques to overcome the computational complexity in order to yield models that are solvable in near real-time. This book demonstrates how batch processes can be analyzed, synthesized, and designed optimally using proven mathematical formulations. The text effectively demonstrates how water and energy aspects can be incorporated within the scheduling framework that seeks to capture the essence of time. It presents real-life case studies where mathematical modeling of batch plants has been successfully applied.</p>

Includex index

Introduction to batch processes. - - Modelling for effective solutions: reduction of binary variables. - - Methods to reduce computational time: prediction of time points. - - Integration of scheduling and heat integration: minimization of energy requirements. - - Heat integration in multipurpose batch plants. - - Design and synthesis of heat-integrated batch plants using an effective technique. - - Simultaneous scheduling and water optimization: reduction of effluent in batch facilities. - - Optimization of energy and water use in multipurpose batch plants using an improved mathematical formulation. - - Targeting for long-term time horizons: water optimization. - - Long-term heat integration in multipurpose batch plants using heat storage.

Batch chemical processes are always ideal in the manufacture of small-volume, high-value-added products, as traditionally encountered in pharmaceutical,agrochemical and food and beverage industries. The main distinción between these processes and their continuous counterparts pertains to the handling of time. Continuous operations can attain steady state, wherein time is completely overridden, whereas batch operations are never at steady state. This simply implies that time can never be ignored in the analysis of batch processes. Consequently, the synthesis, design and optimization of these operations should embed time as a critical dimension.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Reaction engineering and chemical reactor design is a core subdiscipline in the field of chemical engineering, and is central to many industrial applications. The authors offer a more specialized treatment that focuses on batch chemical processes (i.e., reactions carried out in a sealed vessel without continuous inflow and outflow streams). Special emphasis is placed on computational analysis of batch processes, an essential skill in modern engineering positions. It is recommended that the reader have completed at least one semester of undergraduate chemical engineering and reactor design coursework before attempting to read this book. By necessity, the work's tone is highly mathematical. Most of the graphical figures depict flowcharts of multistage chemical processes, whereas results are usually presented in tabulated form with fewer data plots. Each chapter concludes with multiple case studies and a list of references from the past two decades of engineering literature. The case studies are not particularly detailed and do not capture the reader's interest (e.g., "three raw materials" and "three products," without specifying the particular product or even the sector of business). The book is recommended only for upper-level students and specialists working in the chemical engineering industry. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above; faculty and professionals. --Michael R. King, Vanderbilt University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Thokozani Majozi is a full professor in the School of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering at Wits University where he also holds the NRF/DST Chair in Sustainable Process Engineering. His main research interest is batch chemical process integration, where he has made significant scientific contributions that have earned him international recognition. Some of these contributions have been adopted by industry. Prior to joining Wits, he spent almost 10 years at the University of Pretoria, initially as an associate professor and later as a full professor of chemical engineering. He was also an associate professor in computer science at the University of Pannonia in Hungary from 2005 to 2009. Majozi completed his PhD in Process Integration at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology in the United Kingdom. He is a member of Academy of Sciences of South Africa and a Fellow for the Academy of Engineering of SA. He has received numerous awards for his research including the Burianec Memorial Award (Italy), S2A3 British Association Medal (Silver) and the South African Institution of Chemical Engineers Bill Neal-May Gold Medal. He is also twice a recipient of the NSTF Award and twice the recipient of the NRF President's Award. Majozi is author and co-author of more than 150 scientific publications, including 2 books in Batch Chemical Process Integration published by Springer and CRC Press in 2010 and 2015, respectively.</p> <p> Esmael Seid obtained his B.Sc. in Chemical Engineering from Bhair Dar University, Ethiopia. He then worked in process industry for three years after his B.Sc. before joining University of Pretoria, South Africa, in 2009, where he obtained his MScEng and PhD degrees in Chemical Engineering. Dr Seid has several publications in international refereed journals on design, synthesis, scheduling, and resource conservation, with particular emphasis on water and energy for multipurpose batch plants. He is currently a visiting scholar at Chemical Engineering Department, Texas A&M University working on Sustainable process design through process integration.</p> <p>Jui-Yuan Lee is an assistant professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, Taiwan. Dr Lee received his PhD in Chemical Engineering from National Taiwan University (NTU) in 2011, and conducted postdoctoral research at NTU (2011-2013) and University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa (2013-2014). His research centres on process integration for energy savings and waste reduction, with research interests covering low-carbon energy system planning and hybrid power system design. He has published more than 30 journal papers and 40 conference papers, and coedited a book on batch process integration. Dr Lee is working closely with several collaborators mainly in South-east Asia and Africa.</p>

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