Sistema de Bibliotecas Universidad de América | SISTEMA DE BIBLIOTECAS

ACERCA DE NOSOTROS

Interfaces in microbial ecology K. C. Marshall

By: Marshall, K. C [autor]Publisher: United states Harvard University Press ©1976Description: x, 156 pages illustrations, figures, tables. 24 cmContent type: Media type: Carrier type: ISBN: 0674458222Subject(s): Ecologia microbiana | Microbiologia | MicroorganismosDDC classification: 576.15
Contents:
Introduction to the Concept of Interfaces in Microbial Ecology -- Liquid-Liquid and Gas-Liquid Interfaces -- Solid-Liquid and Solid-Gas Interfaces -- Nonspecific Interfacial Interactions in Microbial Ecology: Aquatic Ecosystems -- Nonspecific Interfacial Interactions in Microbial Ecology: Terrestrial Ecosystems -- Specific Interfacial Interactions in Microbial Ecology.
Summary: Natural microbial habitats include various interfaces--liquid-liquid, gas-liquid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas. An interface, the boundary between two phases, has physical and chemical properties that differ from those of either phase. Bacteria, yeasts, and algae often concentrate at interfaces, and the ability of microorganisms to exploit resources in their environment may be markedly affected by the nature of the available interfaces. Included within the realm of microbial activity at interfaces are such wide-ranging topics as predator-prey relations, tooth decay, gastrointestinal tract infections, mating contact, marine fouling, adsorptive bubble processes, oil degradation, rhizosphere associations, and bacterium-clay interactions. In this book, bacteria are treated as living colloidal systems, and the behavior of microorganisms at interfaces is analyzed on the basis of this concept. Nonspecific physical and chemical forces acting on microorganisms at interfaces are described and related to biological factors determining the distribution of and interaction between microorganisms in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The final chapter describes specific microbe-microbe, microbe-plant, and microbe-animal interfacial interactions.
List(s) this item appears in: Ingeniería Química
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book B. Campus los Cerros
Colección general
Colección general 576.15 M354 (Browse shelf) 1976 1 Available 0000056098
Total holds: 0

Include index.

Include references.

Introduction to the Concept of Interfaces in Microbial Ecology -- Liquid-Liquid and Gas-Liquid Interfaces -- Solid-Liquid and Solid-Gas Interfaces -- Nonspecific Interfacial Interactions in Microbial Ecology: Aquatic Ecosystems -- Nonspecific Interfacial Interactions in Microbial Ecology: Terrestrial Ecosystems -- Specific Interfacial Interactions in Microbial Ecology.

Natural microbial habitats include various interfaces--liquid-liquid, gas-liquid, solid-liquid, and solid-gas. An interface, the boundary between two phases, has physical and chemical properties that differ from those of either phase. Bacteria, yeasts, and algae often concentrate at interfaces, and the ability of microorganisms to exploit resources in their environment may be markedly affected by the nature of the available interfaces. Included within the realm of microbial activity at interfaces are such wide-ranging topics as predator-prey relations, tooth decay, gastrointestinal tract infections, mating contact, marine fouling, adsorptive bubble processes, oil degradation, rhizosphere associations, and bacterium-clay interactions. In this book, bacteria are treated as living colloidal systems, and the behavior of microorganisms at interfaces is analyzed on the basis of this concept. Nonspecific physical and chemical forces acting on microorganisms at interfaces are described and related to biological factors determining the distribution of and interaction between microorganisms in both aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The final chapter describes specific microbe-microbe, microbe-plant, and microbe-animal interfacial interactions.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.

Powered by Koha