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The competitive advantage of nations Michael E. Porter

By: Porter, Michael E [autor]
Publisher: United States of America The Free Press 1990Description: xxxii, 855 pages Ilustrations, figures 24 cmContent type: Media type: Carrier type: Subject(s): Empresas - política gubernamental | Estratégias empresariales | Gestion IndustrialDDC classification: 338.9
Contents:
The need for a new paradigm. - - The competitive advantage of firms in global industries. - - Determinants of national competitive advantage. - - The dynamics of national advantage. - - Four studies in national advantage. - - National competitive advantage in services. - - Patterns of national competitive advantage: The early postwar winners. - - Emerging nations in the 1970s and 1980s. - - Shifting national advantage. - - The competitive development of national economics. - - Company strategy. - - Government policy. - - National agendas.
Summary: Michael Porter's The Competitive Advantage of Nations has changed completely our conception of how prosperity is created and sustained in the modern global economy. Porter's groundbreaking study of international competitiveness has shaped national policy in countries around the world. It has also transformed thinking and action in states, cities, companies, and even entire regions such as Central America. Based on research in ten leading trading nations, The Competitive Advantage of Nations offers the first theory of competitiveness based on the causes of the productivity with which companies compete. Porter shows how traditional comparative advantages such as natural resources and pools of labor have been superseded as sources of prosperity, and how broad macroeconomic accounts of competitiveness are insufficient. The book introduces Porter's "diamond," a whole new way to understand the competitive position of a nation (or other locations) in global competition that is now an integral part of international business thinking. Porter's concept of "clusters," or groups of interconnected firms, suppliers, related industries, and institutions that arise in particular locations, has become a new way for companies and governments to think about economies, assess the competitive advantage of locations, and set public policy. Even before publication of the book, Porter's theory had guided national reassessments in New Zealand and elsewhere. His ideas and personal involvement have shaped strategy in countries as diverse as the Netherlands, Portugal, Taiwan, Costa Rica, and India, and regions such as Massachusetts, California, and the Basque country. Hundreds of cluster initiatives have flourished throughout the world. In an era of intensifying global competition, this pathbreaking book on the new wealth of nations has become the standard by which all future work must be measured.
List(s) this item appears in: Negocios Internacionales
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book B. Posgrados
Colección general
Colección general 338.9 P833 (Browse shelf) 1990 3 Available 0000056081
Total holds: 0

includes index; appendices. - - Appendiz A. Methodology for preparing the cluster charts. - - B. Supplementary data on national trade patterns.

The need for a new paradigm. - - The competitive advantage of firms in global industries. - - Determinants of national competitive advantage. - - The dynamics of national advantage. - - Four studies in national advantage. - - National competitive advantage in services. - - Patterns of national competitive advantage: The early postwar winners. - - Emerging nations in the 1970s and 1980s. - - Shifting national advantage. - - The competitive development of national economics. - - Company strategy. - - Government policy. - - National agendas.

Michael Porter's The Competitive Advantage of Nations has changed completely our conception of how prosperity is created and sustained in the modern global economy. Porter's groundbreaking study of international competitiveness has shaped national policy in countries around the world. It has also transformed thinking and action in states, cities, companies, and even entire regions such as Central America. Based on research in ten leading trading nations, The Competitive Advantage of Nations offers the first theory of competitiveness based on the causes of the productivity with which companies compete. Porter shows how traditional comparative advantages such as natural resources and pools of labor have been superseded as sources of prosperity, and how broad macroeconomic accounts of competitiveness are insufficient. The book introduces Porter's "diamond," a whole new way to understand the competitive position of a nation (or other locations) in global competition that is now an integral part of international business thinking. Porter's concept of "clusters," or groups of interconnected firms, suppliers, related industries, and institutions that arise in particular locations, has become a new way for companies and governments to think about economies, assess the competitive advantage of locations, and set public policy. Even before publication of the book, Porter's theory had guided national reassessments in New Zealand and elsewhere. His ideas and personal involvement have shaped strategy in countries as diverse as the Netherlands, Portugal, Taiwan, Costa Rica, and India, and regions such as Massachusetts, California, and the Basque country. Hundreds of cluster initiatives have flourished throughout the world. In an era of intensifying global competition, this pathbreaking book on the new wealth of nations has become the standard by which all future work must be measured.

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