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The visible hand : The managerial revolution in American business / Alfred D. Chandler, Jr.

By: Chandler, Alfred D., Jr [autor]
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, ©1977Description: xvi, 608 páginas : ilustraciones ; 24 cmContent type: texto Media type: no mediado Carrier type: volumenISBN: 9780674940529Subject(s): Gestion industrial -- Historia -- Estados Unidos | Industria -- Estados Unidos | Organizacion industrial -- Historia -- Estados UnidosDDC classification: 658.400973
Contents:
The traditional processes of production and distribution. -- The revolution in trasportation and communication. -- The revolution in distribution and production. -- The management and growth of modern insdustrial enterpirse.
Summary: The role of large-scale business enterprise-big business and its managers-during the formative years of modern capitalism (from the 1850s until the 1920s) is delineated in this pathmarking book. Alfred Chandler, Jr., the distinguished business historian, sets forth the reasons for the dominance of big business in American transportation, communications, and the central sectors of production and distribution. The managerial revolution, presented here with force and conviction, is the story of how the visible hand of management replaced what Adam Smith called the 'invisible hand' of market forces. Chandler shows that the fundamental shift toward managers running large enterprises exerted a far greater influence in determining size and concentration in American industry than other factors so often cited as critical: the quality of entrepreneurship, the availability of capital, or public policy.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book B. Posgrados
Colección general
Colección general 658.400973 C455 (Browse shelf) 1977 1 Available 0000042681
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>The role of large-scale business enterprise?big business and its managers?during the formative years of modern capitalism (from the 1850s until the 1920s) is delineated in this pathmarking book. Alfred Chandler, Jr., the distinguished business historian, sets forth the reasons for the dominance of big business in American transportation, communications, and the central sectors of production and distribution.<br> <br> The managerial revolution, presented here with force and conviction, is the story of how the visible hand of management replaced what Adam Smith called the ?invisible hand? of market forces. Chandler shows that the fundamental shift toward managers running large enterprises exerted a far greater influence in determining size and concentration in American industry than other factors so often cited as critical: the quality of entrepreneurship, the availability of capital, or public policy.</p>

Include appendix and index

The traditional processes of production and distribution. -- The revolution in trasportation and communication. -- The revolution in distribution and production. -- The management and growth of modern insdustrial enterpirse.

The role of large-scale business enterprise-big business and its managers-during the formative years of modern capitalism (from the 1850s until the 1920s) is delineated in this pathmarking book. Alfred Chandler, Jr., the distinguished business historian, sets forth the reasons for the dominance of big business in American transportation, communications, and the central sectors of production and distribution. The managerial revolution, presented here with force and conviction, is the story of how the visible hand of management replaced what Adam Smith called the 'invisible hand' of market forces. Chandler shows that the fundamental shift toward managers running large enterprises exerted a far greater influence in determining size and concentration in American industry than other factors so often cited as critical: the quality of entrepreneurship, the availability of capital, or public policy.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Introduction: The Visible Hand Modern Business Enterprise Defined Some General Propositions
  • Part I The Traditional Processes of Production and Distribution
  • 1 The Traditional Enterprise in Commerce Institutional Specialization and Market Coordination
  • The General Merchant of the Colonial World
  • Specialization in Commerce
  • Specialization in Finance and Transportation
  • Managing the Specialized Enterprise in Commerce
  • Managing the Specialized Enterprise in Finance and Transportation
  • Technological Limits to Institutional Change in Commerce
  • 2 The Traditional Enterprise in Production
  • Technological Limits to Institutional Change in Production
  • The Expansion of Prefactory Production, 1790-1840
  • Managing Traditional Production
  • The Plantation-an Ancient Form of Large-Scale Production
  • The Integrated Textile Mill-a New Form of Large-Scale Production
  • The Springfield Armory-Another Prototype of the Modern
  • Factory Lifting Technological Constraints
  • Part II The Revolution in Transportation and Communication
  • 3 The Railroads: The First Modern Business Enterprises, 1850s-1860s
  • Innovation in Technology and Organization
  • The Impact of the Railroads on Construction and Finance
  • Structural Innovation Accounting and Statistical Innovation
  • Organizational Innovation Evaluated
  • 4 Railroad Cooperation and Competition, 1870s-1880s
  • New Patterns of Interfirm Relationships
  • Cooperation to Expand Through Traffic
  • Cooperation to Control Competition
  • The Great Cartels
  • The Managerial Role
  • 5 System-Building, 1880s-1900s
  • Top Management Decision Making Building the First Systems
  • System-Building in the 1880s
  • Reorganization and Rationalization in the 1880s
  • Structures for the New Systems
  • The Bureaucratization of Railroad Administration
  • 6 Completing the Infrastructure
  • Other Transportation and Communication
  • Enterprises Transportation: Steamship Lines and Urban
  • Traction Systems Communication: The Postal Service, Telegraph, and Telephone
  • The Organizational Response
  • Part III The Revolution in Distribution and Production
  • 7 Mass Distribution
  • The Basic Transformation
  • The Modern Commodity Dealer
  • The Wholesale Jobber
  • The Mass Retailer
  • The Department Store
  • The Mail-Order House
  • The Chain Store
  • The Economies of Speed
  • 8 Mass Production
  • The Basic Transformation Expansion of the Factory System
  • The Mechanical Industries
  • The Refining and Distilling Industries
  • The Metal-Making Industries
  • The Metal-Working Industries
  • The Beginnings of Scientific Management
  • The Economies of Speed
  • Part IV The Integration of Mass Production with Mass Distribution
  • 9 The Coming of the Modern Industrial Corporation Reasons for Integration
  • Integration by Users of Continuous-Process
  • Technology Integration by Processors of Perishable
  • Products Intergration by Machinery Makers
  • Requiring Specialized Marketing Services
  • The Followers
  • 10 Integration by the Way of Merger
  • Combination and Consolidation
  • The Mergers of the 1880s Mergers, 1890-1903
  • The Success and Failure of Mergers
  • 11 Integration Completed An Overview: 1900-1917
  • Growth by Vertical Integration-a Description Food a

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