Sistema de Bibliotecas Universidad de América | SISTEMA DE BIBLIOTECAS

ACERCA DE NOSOTROS

Used advanced automation an project management to simplify refinery construction E. Spiropoulus

By: Spiropoulos, ESubject(s): Automatización | Equipos de automatización | Gestión de proyectos | Ingeniería In: Hydrocarbon processing Vol.94, No.7, 2015: páginas 39-42Abstract: Process automation in oil refineries is undergoing major changes, driven by customers frustrated by what they consider to be slow and incremental advances from the main automation original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in the industry. ExxonMobil has become a de facto industry representative and is driving vendors like Yokogawa and others to reevaluate how large-scale automation projects are implemented. The customer message is clear: projects take too long; they are too engineering-intensive; and the automation systems frequently become the critical path in the final stages, often causing the project to fall behind schedule. In many instances, automation engineers can legitimately point at process engineers and others for last-minute changes, but with little consolation from the owners. With several hundred major automation projects executed globally each year, the industry-leading automation OEMs can draw on several decades of experience working in various industries and with a range of technologies. Individually and collectively, they are applying their knowledge of best automation practices and lessons learned to answer the question, "How can we do things better?"
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    Average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Holdings: Hydrocarbon processing Vol.94, No.7, 2015: páginas 39-42

Process automation in oil refineries is undergoing major changes, driven by customers frustrated by what they consider to be slow and incremental advances from the main automation original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) in the industry. ExxonMobil has become a de facto industry representative and is driving vendors like Yokogawa and others to reevaluate how large-scale automation projects are implemented. The customer message is clear: projects take too long; they are too engineering-intensive; and the automation systems frequently become the critical path in the final stages, often causing the project to fall behind schedule. In many instances, automation engineers can legitimately point at process engineers and others for last-minute changes, but with little consolation from the owners. With several hundred major automation projects executed globally each year, the industry-leading automation OEMs can draw on several decades of experience working in various industries and with a range of technologies. Individually and collectively, they are applying their knowledge of best automation practices and lessons learned to answer the question, "How can we do things better?"

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.

Powered by Koha