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Biofuels : biotechnology, chemistry, and sustainable development / David M. Mousdale.

By: Mousdale, David M [autor]
Publisher: Boca Ratón : CRC Press, ©2008Description: xix, 404 páginas : ilustraciones, cuadros, fotos, gráficos ; 24 cmContent type: texto Media type: no mediado Carrier type: volumenISBN: 9781420051247Subject(s): Alcohol combustible | Alcohol | Bioquímica | Biotecnologia | Celulosa | Conservacion de los recursos naturales | Energia biomasica | Lignina | Lignocelulosa | Recursos generadores de energíaDDC classification: 662.6692
Contents:
Historical development of bioethanol as a fuel. -- Chemistry, biochemistry and microbiology of lignocellulosic biomass. -- Biotechnology of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks. -- Biochemical engineering and bioprocess management for fuel ethanol. -- The economics of bioethanol. -- Diversifying the biofuels portfolio. -- Radical options for the development of biofuels. -- Biofuels as products of integrated bioprocesses
Summary: Evaluating a wealth of quantitative data, Biofuels: biotechnology, chemestry, and sustainable development discusses different types of biofuels, the sciencie behind their production, the economics of their introduction to the marketplace, their enviromental impacts, and their implications for world agriculture. It broadens the discussion on biofuels beyond bioethanol and biodisel, taking into account the data, ideas, and bioproducts that have appeared over the last fifty years.
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Item type Current location Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Reserve Book Reserve Book B. Campus los Cerros
Colección general
662.6692 M867 (Browse shelf) 2006 1 Available 0000010363
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

<p>Evaluating a wealth of quantitative data, Biofuels: Biotechnology, Chemistry, and Sustainable Development discusses different types of biofuels, the science behind their production, the economics of their introduction to the marketplace, their environmental impacts, and their implications for world agriculture. It broadens the discussion on biofuels beyond bioethanol and biodiesel, taking into account the data, ideas, and bioproducts that have appeared over the last 50 years.</p> <p>An Insider's Look at the Biotech Industry</p> <p>Written by a seasoned expert in the biotech industry, the book analyzes in detail the present status and future prospects of biofuels, from ethanol and biodiesel to biotechnological routes to biohydrogen. It emphasizes the ways biotechnology can improve process economics as well as facilitate sustainable agroindustries and crucial elements of a biobased economy. The author also explores the additional innovations required in microbial and plant biotechnology, metabolic engineering, bioreactor design, and the genetic manipulation of novel biomass species of plants, such as softwoods and algae.</p> <p>The Role of Biofuels in the Future</p> <p>With over 1,000 references and nearly 200 graphs and tables of data, this well-researched, comprehensive work examines the past and present of various biofuels while considering the future of a biocommodity economy.</p>

Includes bibliographical references and index

Historical development of bioethanol as a fuel. -- Chemistry, biochemistry and microbiology of lignocellulosic biomass. -- Biotechnology of bioethanol production from lignocellulosic feedstocks. -- Biochemical engineering and bioprocess management for fuel ethanol. -- The economics of bioethanol. -- Diversifying the biofuels portfolio. -- Radical options for the development of biofuels. -- Biofuels as products of integrated bioprocesses

Evaluating a wealth of quantitative data, Biofuels: biotechnology, chemestry, and sustainable development discusses different types of biofuels, the sciencie behind their production, the economics of their introduction to the marketplace, their enviromental impacts, and their implications for world agriculture. It broadens the discussion on biofuels beyond bioethanol and biodisel, taking into account the data, ideas, and bioproducts that have appeared over the last fifty years.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. xi)
  • Author (p. xix)
  • Chapter 1 Historical Development of Bioethanol as a Fuel (p. 1)
  • 1.1 Ethanol from Neolithic Times (p. 1)
  • 1.2 Ethanol and Automobiles, from Henry Ford to Brazil (p. 4)
  • 1.3 Ethanol as a Transportation Fuel and Additive: Economics and Achievements (p. 11)
  • 1.4 Starch as a Carbon Substrate for Bioethanol Production (p. 17)
  • 1.5 The Promise of Lignocellulosic Biomass (p. 26)
  • 1.6 Thermodynamic and Environmental Aspects of Ethanol as a Biofuel (p. 33)
  • 1.6.1 Net energy balance (p. 33)
  • 1.6.2 Effects on emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants (p. 40)
  • 1.7 Ethanol as a First-Generation Biofuel: Present Status and Future Prospects (p. 42)
  • References (p. 44)
  • Chapter 2 Chemistry, Biochemistry, and Microbiology of Lignocellulosic Biomass (p. 49)
  • 2.1 Biomass as an Energy Source: Traditional and Modern Views (p. 49)
  • 2.2 "Slow Combustion" - Microbial Bioenergetics (p. 52)
  • 2.3 Structural and Industrial Chemistry of Lignocellulosic Biomass (p. 56)
  • 2.3.1 Lignocellulose as a chemical resource (p. 56)
  • 2.3.2 Physical and chemical pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass (p. 57)
  • 2.3.3 Biological pretreatments (p. 63)
  • 2.3.4 Acid hydrolysis to saccharify pretreated lignocellulosic biomass (p. 64)
  • 2.4 Cellulases: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Biotechnology (p. 66)
  • 2.4.1 Enzymology of cellulose degradation by cellulases (p. 66)
  • 2.4.2 Cellulases in lignocellulosic feedstock processing (p. 70)
  • 2.4.3 Molecular biology and biotechnology of cellulase production (p. 71)
  • 2.5 Hemicellulases: New Horizons in Energy Biotechnology (p. 78)
  • 2.5.1 A multiplicity of hemicellulases (p. 78)
  • 2.5.2 Hemicellulases in the processing of lignocellulosic biomass (p. 80)
  • 2.6 Lignin-Degrading Enzymes as Aids in Saccharification (p. 81)
  • 2.7 Commercial Choices of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks for Bioethanol Production (p. 81)
  • 2.8 Biotechnology and Platform Technologies for Lignocellulosic Ethanol (p. 86)
  • References (p. 86)
  • Chapter 3 Biotechnology of Bioethanol Production from Lignocellulosic Feedstocks (p. 95)
  • 3.1 Traditional Ethanologenic Microbes (p. 95)
  • 3.1.1 Yeasts (p. 96)
  • 3.1.2 Bacteria (p. 102)
  • 3.2 Metabolic Engineering of Novel Ethanologens (p. 104)
  • 3.2.1 Increased pentose utilization by ethanologenic yeasts by genetic manipulation with yeast genes for xylose metabolism via xylitol (p. 104)
  • 3.2.2 Increased pentose utilization by ethanologenic yeasts by genetic manipulation with genes for xylose isomerization (p. 111)
  • 3.2.3 Engineering arabinose utilization by ethanologenic yeasts (p. 112)
  • 3.2.4 Comparison of industrial and laboratory yeast strains for ethanol production (p. 114)
  • 3.2.5 Improved ethanol production by naturally pentose-utilizing yeasts (p. 118)
  • 3.3 Assembling Gene Arrays in Bacteria for Ethanol Production (p. 120)
  • 3.3.1 Metabolic routes in bacteria for sugar metabolism and ethanol formation (p. 120)
  • 3.3.2 Genetic and metabolic engineering of bacteria for bioethanol production (p. 121)
  • 3.3.3 Candidate bacterial strains for commercial ethanol production in 2007 (p. 133)
  • 3.4 Extrapolating Trends for Research with Yeasts and Bacteria for Bioethanol Production (p. 135)
  • 3.4.1 "Traditional" microbial ethanologens (p. 135)
  • 3.4.2 "Designer" cells and synthetic organisms (p. 141)
  • References (p. 142)
  • Chapter 4 Biochemical Engineering and Bioprocess Management for Fuel Ethanol (p. 157)
  • 4.1 The Iogen Corporation Process as a Template and Paradigm (p. 157)
  • 4.2 Biomass Substrate Provision and Pretreatment (p. 160)
  • 4.2.1 Wheat straw - new approaches to complete saccharification (p. 161)
  • 4.2.2 Switchgrass (p. 162)
  • 4.2.3 Corn stover (p. 164)
  • 4.2.4 Softwoods (p. 167)
  • 4.2.5 Sugarcane bagasse (p. 170)
  • 4.2.6 Other large-scale agricultural and forestry biomass feedstocks (p. 171)
  • 4.3 Fermentation Media and the "Very High Gravity" Concept (p. 172)
  • 4.3.1 Fermentation media for bioethanol production (p. 173)
  • 4.3.2 Highly concentrated media developed for alcohol fermentations (p. 174)
  • 4.4 Fermentor Design and Novel Fermentor Technologies (p. 179)
  • 4.4.1 Continuous fermentations for ethanol production (p. 179)
  • 4.4.2 Fed-batch fermentations (p. 184)
  • 4.4.3 Immobilized yeast and bacterial cell production designs (p. 185)
  • 4.4.4 Contamination events and buildup in fuel ethanol plants (p. 187)
  • 4.5 Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation and Direct Microbial Conversion (p. 189)
  • 4.6 Downstream Processing and By-Products (p. 194)
  • 4.6.1 Ethanol recovery from fermented broths (p. 194)
  • 4.6.2 Continuous ethanol recovery from fermentors (p. 195)
  • 4.6.3 Solid by-products from ethanol fermentations (p. 196)
  • 4.7 Genetic Manipulation of Plants for Bioethanol Production (p. 199)
  • 4.7.1 Engineering resistance traits for biotic and abiotic stresses (p. 199)
  • 4.7.2 Bioengineering increased crop yield (p. 200)
  • 4.7.3 Optimizing traits for energy crops intended for biofuel production (p. 203)
  • 4.7.4 Genetic engineering of dual-use food plants and dedicated energy crops (p. 205)
  • 4.8 A Decade of Lignocellulosic Bioprocess Development: Stagnation or Consolidation? (p. 206)
  • References (p. 211)
  • Chapter 5 The Economics of Bioethanol (p. 227)
  • 5.1 Bioethanol Market Forces in 2007 (p. 227)
  • 5.1.1 The impact of oil prices on the "future" of biofuels after 1980 (p. 227)
  • 5.1.2 Production price, taxation, and incentives in the market economy (p. 228)
  • 5.2 Cost Models for Bioethanol Production (p. 230)
  • 5.2.1 Early benchmarking studies of corn and lignocellulosic ethanol in the United States (p. 231)
  • 5.2.2 Corn ethanol in the 1980s: rising industrial ethanol prices and the development of the "incentive" culture (p. 238)
  • 5.2.3 Western Europe in the mid-1980s: assessments of biofuels programs made at a time of falling real oil prices (p. 239)
  • 5.2.4 Brazilian sugarcane ethanol in 1985: after the first decade of the Proalcool Program to substitute for imported oil (p. 242)
  • 5.2.5 Economics of U.S. corn and biomass ethanol economics in the mid-1990s (p. 243)
  • 5.2.6 Lignocellulosic ethanol in the mid-1990s: the view from Sweden (p. 244)
  • 5.2.7 Subsequent assessments of lignocellulosic ethanol in Europe and the United States (p. 246)
  • 5.3 Pilot Plant and Industrial Extrapolations for Lignocellulosic Ethanol (p. 251)
  • 5.3.1 Near-future projections for bioethanol production costs (p. 251)
  • 5.3.2 Short- to medium-term technical process improvements with their anticipated economic impacts (p. 253)
  • 5.3.3 Bioprocess economics: a Chinese perspective (p. 257)
  • 5.4 Delivering Biomass Substrates for Bioethanol Production: The Economics of a New Industry (p. 258)
  • 5.4.1 Upstream factors: biomass collection and delivery (p. 258)
  • 5.4.2 Modeling ethanol distribution from production to the end user (p. 259)
  • 5.5 Sustainable Development and Bioethanol Production (p. 260)
  • 5.5.1 Definitions and semantics (p. 260)
  • 5.5.2 Global and local sustainable biomass sources and production (p. 261)
  • 5.5.3 Sustainability of sugar-derived ethanol in Brazil (p. 264)
  • 5.5.4 Impact of fuel economy on ethanol demand for gasoline blends (p. 269)
  • 5.6 Scraping the Barrel: an Emerging Reliance on Biofuels and Biobased Products? (p. 271)
  • References (p. 279)
  • Chapter 6 Diversifying the Biofuels Portfolio (p. 285)
  • 6.1 Biodiesel: Chemistry and Production Processes (p. 285)
  • 6.1.1 Vegetable oils and chemically processed biofuels (p. 285)
  • 6.1.2 Biodiesel composition and production processes (p. 287)
  • 6.1.3 Biodiesel economics (p. 293)
  • 6.1.4 Energetics of biodiesel production and effects on greenhouse gas emissions (p. 295)
  • 6.1.5 Issues of ecotoxicity and sustainability with expanding biodiesel production (p. 299)
  • 6.2 Fischer-Tropsch Diesel: Chemical Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Transformations (p. 301)
  • 6.2.1 The renascence of an old chemistry for biomass-based fuels? (p. 301)
  • 6.2.2 Economics and environmental impacts of FT diesel (p. 303)
  • 6.3 Methanol, Glycerol, Butanol, and Mixed-Product "Solvents" (p. 305)
  • 6.3.1 Methanol: thermochemical and biological routes (p. 305)
  • 6.3.2 Glycerol: fermentation and chemical synthesis routes (p. 307)
  • 6.3.3 ABE (acetone, butanol, and ethanol) and "biobutanol" (p. 309)
  • 6.4 Advanced Biofuels: A 30-Year Technology Train (p. 311)
  • References (p. 314)
  • Chapter 7 Radical Options for the Development of Biofuels (p. 321)
  • 7.1 Biodiesel from Microalgae and Microbes (p. 321)
  • 7.1.1 Marine and aquatic biotechnology (p. 321)
  • 7.1.2 "Microdiesel" (p. 324)
  • 7.2 Chemical Routes for the Production of Monooxygenated C6 Liquid Fuels from Biomass Carbohydrates (p. 324)
  • 7.3 Biohydrogen (p. 325)
  • 7.3.1 The hydrogen economy and fuel cell technologies (p. 325)
  • 7.3.2 Bioproduction of gases: methane and H[subscript 2] as products of anaerobic digestion (p. 328)
  • 7.3.3 Production of H[subscript 2] by photosynthetic organisms (p. 334)
  • 7.3.4 Emergence of the hydrogen economy (p. 341)
  • 7.4 Microbial Fuel Cells: Eliminating the Middlemen of Energy Carriers (p. 343)
  • 7.5 Biofuels or a Biobased Commodity Chemical Industry? (p. 346)
  • References (p. 347)
  • Chapter 8 Biofuels as Products of Integrated Bioprocesses (p. 353)
  • 8.1 The Biorefinery Concept (p. 353)
  • 8.2 Biomass Gasification as a Biorefinery Entry Point (p. 356)
  • 8.3 Fermentation Biofuels as Biorefinery Pivotal Products (p. 357)
  • 8.3.1 Succinic acid (p. 361)
  • 8.3.2 Xylitol and "rare" sugars as fine chemicals (p. 364)
  • 8.3.3 Glycerol - A biorefinery model based on biodiesel (p. 367)
  • 8.4 The Strategic Integration of Biorefineries with the Twenty-First Century Fermentation Industry (p. 369)
  • 8.5 Postscript: What Biotechnology Could Bring About by 2030 (p. 372)
  • 8.5.1 Chicago, Illinois, October 16-18, 2007 (p. 373)
  • 8.5.2 Biotechnology and strategic energy targets beyond 2020 (p. 375)
  • 8.5.3 Do biofuels need - rather than biotechnology - the petrochemical industry? (p. 377)
  • References (p. 379)
  • Index (p. 385)

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