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Energy and the environment / James A. Fay, Dan S. Golomb.

By: Fay, James A [autor]
Contributor(s): Golomb, D [autor]
Series: MIT-Pappalardo series in mechanical engineeringPublisher: New York : Oxford University Press, ©2002Description: xxi, 314 páginas : ilustraciones ; 25 cmContent type: Media type: Carrier type: ISBN: 0195150929Subject(s): Combustibles | Medio ambiente -- NormasDDC classification: 333.7914 Online resources: Table of contents only
Contents:
Energy and the environment. -- Global energy use and supply. -- Thermodynamic principles of energy conversions. -- Electrical energy generation, transmission, and storage. -- Fossil \2013 fueled power plants. -- Nuclear \2013 fueled power plants. -- Renewable energy. -- Transportation. -- Environmental effects of fossil fuel use. -- Global warming. -- Concluding remarks.
Abstract: In 1996, the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering adopted a new undergraduate curriculum to enhance the learning process of its students. In this new curriculum, key concepts of engineering are taught in four integrated sequences: the thermodynamics/heat transfer/fluid mechanics sequence, the mechanics/materials sequence, the design/manufacturing sequence, and the systems/dynamics/control sequence. In each one of the four sequences, the basic principles are presented in the context of real engineering problems that require simultaneous use of all basic principles to solve engineering tasks ranging from synthesis to analysis. Active learning, including hands-on experience, is a key element of this new curriculum.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book B. Campus los Cerros
Colección general
Colección general 333.7914 F29e (Browse shelf) 2002 1 Available 0000015008
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

In an age of mounting energy crises, James A. Fay and Dan S. Golomb's Energy and the Environment offers a timely treatment of a critical problem in urban-industrial societies: the worldwide growth of energy use and the destructive relationship between this energy use and environmentaldegradation. This comprehensive text provides the scientific and technological background for understanding how our ever-increasing use of energy threatens the natural environment at local, regional, and global scales and how this threat could be mitigated by more efficient use of conventionalenergy sources and their replacement by renewable energy sources. Designed for upper-level undergraduate and first-year graduate students, Energy and the Environment is essential reading for students and professionals in energy and environmental sciences and technology.Features* Describes energy technologies and their effectiveness in transforming fossil, nuclear, and renewable energy into useful mechanical or electrical power* Emphasizes the generation of electric power and the technological improvements that increase power generation efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions from power plants* Examines the use of energy in the transportation sector and how vehicle design and engine efficiency improvements could reduce fuel use and pollutant emissions* Objectively surveys the field of renewable energy technologies and the prospects of increasing the share of renewable energy among all energy sources* Analyzes the energy sources of toxic emissions to air, water, and land and their effects on environmental quality at local and regional scales* Examines global climate change, energy consumption's contribution to it, and the salient technologies being developed to mitigate this effect* Equips engineering majors, science majors, and professionals with the basic facts needed to develop solutions to these pressing environmental problems

Energy and the environment. -- Global energy use and supply. -- Thermodynamic principles of energy conversions. -- Electrical energy generation, transmission, and storage. -- Fossil \2013 fueled power plants. -- Nuclear \2013 fueled power plants. -- Renewable energy. -- Transportation. -- Environmental effects of fossil fuel use. -- Global warming. -- Concluding remarks.

In 1996, the MIT Department of Mechanical Engineering adopted a new undergraduate curriculum to enhance the learning process of its students. In this new curriculum, key concepts of engineering are taught in four integrated sequences: the thermodynamics/heat transfer/fluid mechanics sequence, the mechanics/materials sequence, the design/manufacturing sequence, and the systems/dynamics/control sequence. In each one of the four sequences, the basic principles are presented in the context of real engineering problems that require simultaneous use of all basic principles to solve engineering tasks ranging from synthesis to analysis. Active learning, including hands-on experience, is a key element of this new curriculum.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • List of Tables
  • Foreword
  • Preface
  • 1 Energy and the Environment
  • 1.1 Introduction
  • 1.1.1 An Overview of this Text
  • 1.2 Energy
  • 1.2.1 Electric Power
  • 1.2.2 Transportation Energy
  • 1.2.3 Energy as a Commodity
  • 1.3 The Environment
  • 1.3.1 Managing Industrial Pollution
  • 2 Global Energy Use and Supply
  • 2.1 Introduction
  • 2.2 Global Energy Consumption
  • 2.3 Global Energy Sources
  • 2.4 Global Electricity Consumption
  • 2.5 Global Carbon Emissions
  • 2.6 End-Use Energy Consumption in the United States
  • 2.6.1 Industrial Sector
  • 2.6.2 Residential Sector
  • 2.6.3 Commercial Sector
  • 2.6.4 Transportation Sector
  • 2.7 Global Energy Supply
  • 2.7.1 Coal Reserves
  • 2.7.2 Petroleum Reserves
  • 2.7.3 Unconventional Petroleum Resources
  • 2.7.4 Natural Gas Reserves
  • 2.7.5 Unconventional Gas Resources
  • 2.7.6 Summary of Fossil Reserves
  • 3 Thermodynamic Principles of Energy Conversion
  • 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 The Forms of Energy
  • 3.2.1 The Mechanical Energy of Macroscopic Bodies
  • 3.2.2 The Energy of Atoms and Molecules
  • 3.2.3 Chemical and Nuclear Energy
  • 3.2.4 Electric and Magnetic Energy
  • 3.2.5 Total Energy
  • 3.3 Work and Heat Interactions
  • 3.3.1 Work Interaction
  • 3.3.2 Heat Interaction
  • 3.4 The First Law of Thermodynamics
  • 3.5 The Second Law of Thermodynamics
  • 3.6 Thermodynamic Properties
  • 3.7 Steady Flow
  • 3.8 Heat Transfer and Heat Exchange
  • 3.9 Combustion of Fossil Fuel
  • 3.9.1 Fuel Heating Value
  • 3.10 Ideal Heat Engine Cycles
  • 3.10.1 The Carnot Cycle
  • 3.10.2 The Rankine Cycle
  • 3.10.3 The Otto Cycle
  • 3.10.4 The Brayton Cycle
  • 3.10.5 Combined Brayton and Rankine Cycle
  • 3.11 The Vapor Compression Cycle: Refrigeration and Heat Pumps
  • 3.12 Fuel Cells
  • 3.13 Fuel (Thermal) Efficiency
  • 3.14 Synthetic Fuels
  • 3.14.1 The Hydrogen Economy
  • 4 Electrical Energy Generation, Transmission, and Storage
  • 4.1 Introduction
  • 4.2 Electromechanical Power Transformation
  • 4.3 Electric Power Transmission
  • 4.3.1 AC/DC Conversion
  • 4.4 Energy Storage
  • 4.4.1 Electrostatic Energy Storage
  • 4.4.2 Magnetic Energy Storage
  • 4.4.3 Electrochemical Energy Storage
  • 4.4.4 Mechanical Energy Storage
  • 4.4.5 Properties of Energy Storage Systems
  • 5 Fossil-Fueled Power Plants
  • 5.1 Introduction
  • 5.2 Fossil-Fueled Power Plant Components
  • 5.2.1 Fuel Storage and Preparation
  • 5.2.2 Burner
  • 5.2.3 Boiler
  • 5.2.4 Steam Turbine
  • 5.2.5 Gas Turbine
  • 5.2.6 Condenser
  • 5.2.7 Cooling Tower
  • 5.2.8 Generator
  • 5.2.9 Emission Control
  • 5.2.10 Waste Disposal
  • 5.3 Advanced Cycles
  • 5.3.1 Combined Cycles
  • 5.3.2 Coal Gasification Combined Cycle
  • 5.3.3 Cogeneration
  • 5.3.4 Fuel Cell
  • 6 Nuclear-Fueled Power Plants
  • 6.1 Introduction
  • 6.2 Nuclear Energy
  • 6.3 Radioactivity
  • 6.3.1 Decay Rates and Half-Lives
  • 6.3.2 Units and Dosage
  • 6.4 Nuclear Reactors
  • 6.4.1 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR)
  • 6.4.2 Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)
  • 6.4.3 Gas-Cooled Reactor (GCR)
  • 6.4.4 Breeder Reactor (BR)
  • 6.5 Nuclear Fuel Cycle
  • 6.5.1 Mining and Refining
  • 6.5.2 Gasification and Enrichment
  • 6.5.3 Spent Fuel Reprocessing and Temporary Waste Storage
  • 6.5.4 Permanent Waste Disposal
  • 6.6 Fusion
  • 6.6.1 Magnetic Confinement
  • 6.6.2 Laser Fusion
  • 7 Renewable Energy
  • 7.1 Introduction
  • 7.2 Hydropower
  • 7.2.1 Environmental Effects
  • 7.3 Biomass
  • 7.3.1 Environmental Effects
  • 7.4 Geothermal Energy
  • 7.4.1 Environmental Energy
  • 7.5 Solar Energy
  • 7.5.1 The Flat Plate Collector
  • 7.5.2 Focusing Collectors
  • 7.5.3 Photovoltaic Cells
  • 7.6 Wind Power
  • 7.6.1 Environmental Effects
  • 7.7 Tidal Power
  • 7.7.1 Environmental Effects
  • 7.8 Ocean Wave Power
  • 7.9 Ocean Thermal Power
  • 7.10 Captial Cost of Renewable Electric Power
  • 8 Transportation
  • 8.1 Introduction
  • 8.2 Internal Combustion Engines for Highway Vehicles
  • 8.2.1 Combustion in SI and CI Engines
  • 8.3 Engine Power and Performance
  • 8.3.1 Engine Efficiency
  • 8.4 Vehicle Power and Performance
  • 8.4.1 Connecting the Engine to the Wheels
  • 8.5 Vehicle Fuel Efficiency
  • 8.5.1 U.S. Vehicle Fuel Efficiency Regulations and Test Cycles
  • 8.5.2 Improving Vehicle Fuel Economy
  • 8.6 Electric Drive Vehicles
  • 8.6.1 Vehicles Powered by Storage Batteries
  • 8.6.2 Hybrid Vehicles
  • 8.6.3 Fuel Cell Vehicles
  • 8.7 Vehicle Emissions
  • 8.7.1 U.S.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James A. Fay is at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Daniel Golomb is at University of Massachusetts, Lowell.

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