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Más allá de los límites del crecimiento / Donella H. Meadows

By: Meadows, Donella H [autor]
Contributor(s): Meadows, Dennis L [autor] | Randers, Jorgen [autor]
Publisher: México D.F. : Aguilar, ©1993Description: 355 páginas : ; 24 cmContent type: texto Media type: no mediado Carrier type: volumenISBN: 8403592566Subject(s): Analisis de Sistemas | Control de la producción | Demografia | Desarrollo economico | Desarrollo industrial -- Aspectos socioeconómicos | Desarrollo sostenible | Evolución | Planificacion de la produccionDDC classification: 658.503
Contents:
Contenido parcial: Capítulo 1. Sobrepasamiento. -- Capítulo 2. La fuerza motriz: Crecimiento exponencial. -- Capítulo 3. Los límites fuentes y sumideros. -- Capítulo 4. La dinámica del crecimiento en un mundo finito. -- Capítulo 5. Regresando desde más allá de los límites: La historia del ozono. -- Capítulo 6. Tecnología, mercados y sobrepasatiempo. -- Capítulo 7. Transición hacia un sistema sostenible. -- Capítulo 8. Sobrepasamiento sin colapso.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Book Book B. Posgrados
Colección general
Colección general 658.503 M37 (Browse shelf) 2a ed. 1993 1 Available 0000035473
Total holds: 0

Contenido parcial: Capítulo 1. Sobrepasamiento. -- Capítulo 2. La fuerza motriz: Crecimiento exponencial. -- Capítulo 3. Los límites fuentes y sumideros. -- Capítulo 4. La dinámica del crecimiento en un mundo finito. -- Capítulo 5. Regresando desde más allá de los límites: La historia del ozono. -- Capítulo 6. Tecnología, mercados y sobrepasatiempo. -- Capítulo 7. Transición hacia un sistema sostenible. -- Capítulo 8. Sobrepasamiento sin colapso.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Trained as a biophysicist, American scientist Donella H. Meadows earned a Ph.D. from Harvard University. Early in her career, Meadows was a member of a joint Harvard-MIT research group that developed a computer simulation model clarifying relationships between growth and finite resources on the earth. Using this model, the Club of Rome sponsored extensive research that resulted in the best-selling book, "The Limits to Growth" (1972), co-authored by Meadows and others. Attention was focused on a doomsday prognosis if growth continued unchecked. Meadows and her associates, however, presented options for achieving a sustainable society if there were a movement away from dependence on growth, equity in wealth, and if technologies were used to enhance efficiency of natural-resource use. "Toward Global Equilibrium" (1973) and "Dynamics of Growth in a Finite World" (1974) are companion technical volumes to "The Limits to Growth." They present reports on the simulation models, examinations of economic, political, and ethical implications of the findings, and a detailed description of the computer model, World3. <p> In addition to her research sponsored by the Club of Rome, Meadows, as one of the editors of "Groping in the Dark" (1982), fully articulates that basic human needs can be met in the future if social and political structures, as well as values, do not hinder efforts for sustainability and equity. Meadows states that equity, rather than individual and national-wealth aggrandizement, is increasingly recognized as a major factor in planetary survival. Twenty years after "The Limits to Growth," Meadows and others in "Beyond the Limits" (1992) find that some options for a sustainable future have narrowed. However, they claim that new technologies can, if employed wisely, contribute to sustainability. The book emphasizes social-policy options rather than models. <p> After working for two years on the Club of Rome research project, Meadows became a member of the faculty at Dartmouth College where she was systems analyst and adjunct professor in the Environmental Studies Program. Meadows has a lifestyle that reflects her views about sustaining finite resources and valuing equity rather than personal economic gain. She has lived in a commune, studied Zen Buddhism, and believed that people today are ultimately responsible for a future that holds "unspeakable horrors or undreamed-of wonders." She died in 2001 from a bacterial infection. <p> Her titles include Limits to Growth-The 30 year Update, The Electronic Oracle: Computer Models and Social Decisions and Thinking in Systems - A Primer. <p> 30

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