Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Bioprocess engineering Basic concepts Michel L. Shuler, Fikret Kargi.

By: Shuler, Michael L.
Contributor(s): Kargi, Fikret [autor].
Publisher: United States of America Prentice Hall 2002Edition: 2nd edition.Description: xx, 553 pages illustrations 24 cm.Content type: Media type: Carrier type: ISBN: 9780130819086.Subject(s): Biotecnologia | Ingenieria bioquimicaDDC classification: 660.63
Contents:
What is a bioprocess engineer?. - - An overview of biological basics. - - Enzymes. - - How cells work. - - Major metabolicpathways. - - How cells grow. - - Stoichiometry of microbial growth and product formation. - - How cellular information is alteres. - - Operating considerations for bioreactors for suspension and immobilized cultures. - - Selection, scale-up, operation, and control of bioreactors. - - Recovery and purification of products. - - Bioprocess considerations in using animal cell cultures. - - Bioprocess considerations in using plant cell cultures. - - Utilizing genetically engineered organisms. - - Medical applications of bioprocess engineering. - - Mixed cultures.
Summary: In the decade since the first edition of bioprocess engineering: basic concepts, biotechnology has undergone several revolutions. Currently, the ability to sequence the genome of whole organims presents opportunities that could be hardly envisioned ten years ago. Many other technological advances have ocurred that provide bioprocess engineers with new tools to serve society better. However, the principles of bioprocess engineering stated in the first edition remain sound.
List(s) this item appears in: Ingeniería Química
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Barcode Item holds
Reserve Book Reserve Book B. Campus los Cerros
Colección general
Colección general 660.63 S562 (Browse shelf) 2nd edition 2002 1 Available 0000055507
Reserve Book Reserve Book B. Campus los Cerros
Colección general
Colección general 660.63 S562 (Browse shelf) 2nd edition 2002 2 Available 0000056505
Total holds: 0

Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Bioprocess Engineering, Second Edition thoroughly updates the leading introductory textbook on biochemical and bioprocess engineering to reflect advances that are transforming the field -- from genomics to cellular engineering, modeling to nonconventional biological systems. It introduces techniques with wide applicability in pharmaceuticals, biologics, medicine, environmental engineering, and beyond.

Includes index, appendix. - - Traditional industrial bioprocesses

What is a bioprocess engineer?. - - An overview of biological basics. - - Enzymes. - - How cells work. - - Major metabolicpathways. - - How cells grow. - - Stoichiometry of microbial growth and product formation. - - How cellular information is alteres. - - Operating considerations for bioreactors for suspension and immobilized cultures. - - Selection, scale-up, operation, and control of bioreactors. - - Recovery and purification of products. - - Bioprocess considerations in using animal cell cultures. - - Bioprocess considerations in using plant cell cultures. - - Utilizing genetically engineered organisms. - - Medical applications of bioprocess engineering. - - Mixed cultures.

In the decade since the first edition of bioprocess engineering: basic concepts, biotechnology has undergone several revolutions. Currently, the ability to sequence the genome of whole organims presents opportunities that could be hardly envisioned ten years ago. Many other technological advances have ocurred that provide bioprocess engineers with new tools to serve society better. However, the principles of bioprocess engineering stated in the first edition remain sound.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface to the Second Edition (p. xvii)
  • Preface to the First Edition (p. xix)
  • Part 1 Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1 What Is a Bioprocess Engineer? (p. 1)
  • Part 2 The Basics of Biology: An Engineer's Perspective (p. 11)
  • 2 An Overview of Biological Basics (p. 11)
  • 3 Enzymes (p. 57)
  • 4 How Cells Work (p. 105)
  • 5 Major Metabolic Pathways (p. 133)
  • 6 How Cells Grow (p. 155)
  • 7 Stoichiometry of Microbial Growth and Product Formation (p. 207)
  • 8 How Cellular Information is Altered (p. 219)
  • Part 3 Engineering Principles for Bioprocesses (p. 245)
  • 9 Operating Considerations for Bioreactors for Suspension and Immobilized Cultures (p. 245)
  • 10 Selection, Scale-Up, Operation, and Control of Bioreactors (p. 285)
  • 11 Recovery and Purification of Products (p. 329)
  • Part 4 Applications to Nonconventional Biological Systems (p. 385)
  • 12 Bioprocess Considerations in Using Animal Cell Cultures (p. 385)
  • 13 Bioprocess Considerations in Using Plant Cell Cultures (p. 405)
  • 14 Utilizing Genetically Engineered Organisms (p. 421)
  • 15 Medical Applications of Bioprocess Engineering (p. 463)
  • 16 Mixed Cultures (p. 475)
  • 17 Epilogue (p. 513)
  • Appendix Traditional Industrial Bioprocesses (p. 515)
  • A.1. Anaerobic Bioprocesses (p. 515)
  • A.2. Aerobic Processes (p. 524)
  • Suggestions for Further Reading (p. 533)
  • Index (p. 535)

Excerpt provided by Syndetics

Preface to the Second Edition In the decade since the first edition of Bioprocess Engineering: Basic Concepts , biotechnology has undergone several revolutions. Currently, the ability to sequence the genome of whole organisms presents opportunities that could be hardly envisioned ten years ago. Many other technological advances have occurred that provide bioprocess engineers with new tools to serve society better. However, the principles of bioprocess engineering stated in the first edition remain sound. The goals of this revision are threefold. We want to capture for students the excitement created by these advances in biology and biotechnology. We want to inform students about these tools. Most importantly, we want to demonstrate how the principles of bioprocess engineering can be applied in concert with these advances. This edition contains a new section in the first chapter alerting students to the regulatory issues that constrain bioprocess design and modification. We believe students need to be aware of these industrially critical issues. Part 2, "An Overview of Biological Basics," has been updated throughout and expanded. Greater emphasis is given now to posttranslational processing of proteins, as this is a key issue in choice of bioprocessing strategies to make therapeutic proteins. Basic processes in animal cells are more completely described, since animal cell culture is now an established commercial bioprocess technology. Chapter 5 is made more complete by introduction of a section on noncarbohydrate metabolism. Key concepts in functional genomics have been added to prepare students to understand the impact of these emerging ideas and technologies on bioprocesses. In Part 3, "Engineering Principles for Bioprocesses," greater attention is given to issues associated with animal cell bioreactors. The discussion of chromatographic processes is expanded. In Part 4, "Applications to Nonconventional Biological Systems," the material has been rearranged and updated and a new chapter added. These changes are evident in the chapters on animal and plant cell culture. Particularly important is the expanded discussion on choice of host-vector systems for production of proteins from recombinant DNA technology. Coverage of two areas of increasing importance to bioprocess engineers, metabolic and protein engineering, has been expanded. A new chapter on biomedical applications illustrates how approaches to bioprocess engineering are relevant to problems typically considered to be biomedical engineering. The chapter on mixed cultures has been extended to cover advanced waste-water treatment processes. An appendix providing descriptive overviews of some traditional bioprocesses is now included. The suggestions for further reading at the end of each chapter have been updated. We are unable in this book to provide in-depth treatment of many vital topics. These readings give students an easy way to begin to learn more about these topics. Teaching a subject as broad as bioprocess engineering in the typical one-semester, three-credit class has never been easy. Although some material in the first edition has been removed or condensed, the second edition is longer than the first. For students with no formal background in biology, coverage of all of the material in this book would require a four-credit class. In a three-credit class we suggest that the instructor cover Chapters 1 to 11 (with 7 being optional) and then decide on subsequent chapters based on course goals. A course oriented toward biopharmaceuticals will want to include careful coverage of Chapters 12 and 14 and some coverage of 13 and 15. A course oriented toward utilization of bioresources would emphasize Chapter 16 and the Appendix and selected coverage of topics in Chapters 13 and 14. Many students now enter a bioprocess engineering course with formal, college-level instruction in biology and biochemistry. For such students Chapters 2, 4, 5, 7, and 8 can be given as reading assignments to refresh their memories and to insure a uniform, minimal level of biological knowledge. Lecture time can be reserved for material in other chapters or for supplementary material. For these five chapters study questions are provided for self-testing. Under these circumstances the instructor should be able to cover the rest of the material in the book. Excerpted from Bioprocess Engineering: Basic Concepts by Fikret Kargi, Michael L. Shuler All rights reserved by the original copyright owners. Excerpts are provided for display purposes only and may not be reproduced, reprinted or distributed without the written permission of the publisher.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

DR. MICHAEL L. SHULER is Professor in the School of Chemical Engineering, Cornell University. His areas of research include structured models, heterologous protein expression systems, cell culture analogs for pharmacokinetic models, in-vitro toxicology, plant-cell tissue culture, microbial functional genomics, and bioremediation.

DR. FIKRET KARGI is Professor of Environmental Engineering at Dokuz Eylul University in Ismir, Turkey. His current research includes bioprocessing of wastes for production of commercial products, development of novel technologies for biological treatment of problematic wastewaters, nutrient removal, and novel biofilm reactor development.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha