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Introduction to materials science and engineering Yip-wah Chung

By: Chung, Yip-Wah, 1950- [autor].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Boca Raton, Florida Taylor & Francis Group 2007Description: 285 páginas ilustraciones, figuras. 24 cm.Content type: Media type: Carrier type: ISBN: 9780849392634.Subject(s): Ciencias de los materiales | Ingeniería químicaDDC classification: 620.11
Contents:
Crystalline Imperfections and Diffusion. - - Electrical Properties of Metals and Semiconductors. - - Mechanical Properties. - - Phase diagrams. - - Ceramics and composites. - - Polymers. - - Corrosion and Oxidation of Metals and Alloys. - - Magnetic Properties. - - Thin Films.
Summary: Our civilization owes its most significant milestones to our use of materials. Metals gave us better agriculture and eventually the industrial revolution, silicon gave us the digital revolution, and we’re just beginning to see what carbon nanotubes will give us. Taking a fresh, interdisciplinary look at the field, Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering emphasizes the importance of materials to engineering applications and builds the basis needed to select, modify, or create materials to meet specific criteria. The most outstanding feature of this text is the author’s unique and engaging application-oriented approach. Beginning each chapter with a real-life example, an experiment, or several interesting facts, Yip-Wah Chung wields an expertly crafted treatment with which he entertains and motivates as much as he informs and educates. He links the discipline to the life sciences and includes modern developments such as nanomaterials, polymers, and thin films while working systematically from atomic bonding and analytical methods to crystalline, electronic, mechanical, and magnetic properties as well as ceramics, corrosion, and phase diagrams.
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

Our civilization owes its most significant milestones to our use of materials. Metals gave us better agriculture and eventually the industrial revolution, silicon gave us the digital revolution, and we're just beginning to see what carbon nanotubes will give us. Taking a fresh, interdisciplinary look at the field, Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering emphasizes the importance of materials to engineering applications and builds the basis needed to select, modify, or create materials to meet specific criteria.

The most outstanding feature of this text is the author's unique and engaging application-oriented approach. Beginning each chapter with a real-life example, an experiment, or several interesting facts, Yip-Wah Chung wields an expertly crafted treatment with which he entertains and motivates as much as he informs and educates. He links the discipline to the life sciences and includes modern developments such as nanomaterials, polymers, and thin films while working systematically from atomic bonding and analytical methods to crystalline, electronic, mechanical, and magnetic properties as well as ceramics, corrosion, and phase diagrams.

Woven among the interesting examples, stories, and Chinese folk tales is a rigorous yet approachable mathematical and theoretical treatise. This makes Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering an effective tool for anyone needing a strong background in materials science for a broad variety of applications.

Include index.

Include bibliography.

Crystalline Imperfections and Diffusion. - - Electrical Properties of Metals and Semiconductors. - - Mechanical Properties. - - Phase diagrams. - - Ceramics and composites. - - Polymers. - - Corrosion and Oxidation of Metals and Alloys. - - Magnetic Properties. - - Thin Films.

Our civilization owes its most significant milestones to our use of materials. Metals gave us better agriculture and eventually the industrial revolution, silicon gave us the digital revolution, and we’re just beginning to see what carbon nanotubes will give us. Taking a fresh, interdisciplinary look at the field, Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering emphasizes the importance of materials to engineering applications and builds the basis needed to select, modify, or create materials to meet specific criteria. The most outstanding feature of this text is the author’s unique and engaging application-oriented approach. Beginning each chapter with a real-life example, an experiment, or several interesting facts, Yip-Wah Chung wields an expertly crafted treatment with which he entertains and motivates as much as he informs and educates. He links the discipline to the life sciences and includes modern developments such as nanomaterials, polymers, and thin films while working systematically from atomic bonding and analytical methods to crystalline, electronic, mechanical, and magnetic properties as well as ceramics, corrosion, and phase diagrams.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Chapter 1 Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1.1 What Is Materials Science and Engineering? (p. 1)
  • 1.2 Fundamental Principles (p. 3)
  • 1.3 Atomic and Molecular Bonding (p. 5)
  • 1.3.1 Ionic Bonding (p. 6)
  • 1.3.2 Covalent Bonding (p. 9)
  • 1.3.3 Metallic Bonding (p. 11)
  • 1.3.4 Dipole Bonding (p. 12)
  • 1.4 Crystal Structures (p. 14)
  • 1.4.1 Body-Centered Cubic (BCC) (p. 14)
  • 1.4.2 Face-Centered Cubic (FCC) (p. 16)
  • 1.4.3 Hexagonal Close Packed (HCP) (p. 16)
  • 1.5 Polymorphism (p. 18)
  • 1.6 Labeling Directions and Planes (p. 19)
  • 1.6.1 Hexagonal Crystals (p. 21)
  • 1.7 Determination of Structure and Composition Using X-Rays (p. 22)
  • 1.7.1 X-Ray Diffraction (p. 22)
  • 1.7.2 Other Applications of X-Ray Scattering (p. 25)
  • 1.7.3 Composition Determination from Emission of Characteristic X-Rays (p. 27)
  • 1.8 What Is Next? (p. 28)
  • Problems (p. 28)
  • Chapter 2 Crystalline Imperfections and Diffusion (p. 33)
  • 2.1 Cloudy and Clear Ice Experiments (p. 33)
  • 2.2 Imperfections - Good or Bad? (p. 33)
  • 2.3 Solid Solutions (p. 34)
  • 2.4 Point Defects (p. 35)
  • 2.5 Line Defects (p. 38)
  • 2.5.1 Edge Dislocations (p. 38)
  • 2.5.2 Screw Dislocations (p. 39)
  • 2.6 Planar Defects (p. 39)
  • 2.7 Precipitates as Three-Dimensional Defects (p. 41)
  • 2.8 Amorphous Solids (p. 41)
  • 2.9 Temperature Dependence of Defect Concentration (p. 42)
  • 2.10 Atomic Diffusion (p. 44)
  • 2.10.1 Diffusion Due to a Step-Function Concentration Profile (p. 47)
  • 2.10.2 A Word about Diffusion Distance (p. 47)
  • 2.11 Applications of Impurity Diffusion (p. 50)
  • 2.11.1 Case Hardening (p. 50)
  • 2.11.2 Impurity Doping of Semiconductors (p. 50)
  • 2.12 Diffusion in Biological Systems (p. 52)
  • 2.13 What Is Next? (p. 52)
  • Appendix Vacancy Concentration versus Temperature (p. 54)
  • Problems (p. 54)
  • Chapter 3 Electrical Properties of Metals and Semiconductors (p. 59)
  • 3.1 World of Electronics (p. 59)
  • 3.2 Definitions and Units (p. 61)
  • 3.3 Classical Model of Electronic Conduction in Metals (p. 61)
  • 3.4 Resistivity Rules for Dilute Metallic Alloys (p. 63)
  • 3.4.1 Nordheim's Rule (p. 63)
  • 3.4.2 Linde-Norbury Rule (p. 63)
  • 3.5 Energy Band Model for Electronic Conduction (p. 64)
  • 3.6 Intrinsic Semiconductors (p. 64)
  • 3.7 Extrinsic Semiconductors (p. 67)
  • 3.7.1 N-Type Semiconductors (p. 68)
  • 3.7.2 P-Type Semiconductors (p. 69)
  • 3.8 Selected Semiconductor Devices (p. 70)
  • 3.8.1 Hall Probe (p. 70)
  • 3.8.2 PN Junction (p. 71)
  • 3.8.3 Light-Emitting Diodes and Lasers (p. 73)
  • 3.8.4 Solar Cells and X-Ray Detectors (p. 74)
  • 3.8.5 Voltage Regulator (Zener Diode) (p. 75)
  • 3.8.6 Bipolar Junction Transistor (p. 75)
  • 3.8.7 Field Effect Transistor (p. 76)
  • 3.9 Electron Tunneling (p. 77)
  • 3.10 Thin Films and Size Effects (p. 79)
  • 3.11 Thermoelectric Energy Conversion (p. 80)
  • 3.12 Electrical Signaling in Neurons: Lessons from Mother Nature (p. 82)
  • Appendix Ohm's Law and Definitions (p. 83)
  • Problems (p. 85)
  • Chapter 4 Mechanical Properties (p. 89)
  • 4.1 Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross (p. 89)
  • 4.2 Definitions and Units (p. 91)
  • 4.2.1 Stress, Strain, and Young's Modulus (p. 91)
  • 4.2.2 Poisson Ratio (p. 92)
  • 4.2.3 Shear Stress, Shear Strain, and Shear Modulus (p. 93)
  • 4.3 Basic Facts (p. 94)
  • 4.3.1 Young's Modulus (p. 94)
  • 4.3.2 Yield Strength (p. 95)
  • 4.3.3 Ultimate Tensile Strength (p. 95)
  • 4.3.4 Plastic Strain (p. 96)
  • 4.3.5 Hardness (p. 96)
  • 4.4 Plastic Deformation (p. 98)
  • 4.5 Dislocations (p. 100)
  • 4.6 Plastic Deformation of Polycrystalline Materials (p. 101)
  • 4.6.1 Creep (p. 102)
  • 4.6.2 Crying Tin (p. 105)
  • 4.7 Recovery of Plastically Deformed Metals (p. 105)
  • 4.8 Fracture (p. 106)
  • 4.8.1 Toughness (p. 106)
  • 4.8.2 Fracture Mechanics (p. 107)
  • 4.8.3 Fatigue (p. 110)
  • 4.9 Mechanical Properties, Surface Chemistry, and Biology (p. 112)
  • 4.9.1 Fatigue Life of Metals (p. 112)
  • 4.9.2 Ductility of Nickel Aluminide (p. 112)
  • 4.9.3 Tin Whiskers (p. 112)
  • 4.9.4 Enzymes (p. 113)
  • 4.10 Materials Selection: Mechanical Considerations (p. 114)
  • 4.11 Biomedical Considerations (p. 116)
  • Problems (p. 116)
  • Chapter 5 Phase Diagrams (p. 121)
  • 5.1 Rocket Nozzles (p. 121)
  • 5.2 Phase Diagram for a Single-Component System: Graphite/Diamond (p. 121)
  • 5.3 Phase Diagram for a Common Binary System: NaCl + H20 (p. 122)
  • 5.4 Phase Diagram for a Binary Isomorphous System: Ni + Cu (p. 123)
  • 5.4.1 The Lever Rule (p. 125)
  • 5.5 Binary Eutectic Alloys: Microstructure Development (p. 127)
  • 5.6 Zone Refining (p. 128)
  • 5.7 Application of Phase Diagrams in Making Steels (p. 129)
  • 5.7.1 Production of Iron and Steels (p. 129)
  • 5.7.2 Fe-Fe3C Phase Diagram (p. 130)
  • 5.7.3 Microstructure (p. 132)
  • 5.7.3.1 Austenite [rarr] Ferrite + Cementite (p. 132)
  • 5.7.3.2 Bainite (p. 132)
  • 5.7.3.3 Martensite (p. 132)
  • 5.7.4 Transformation Kinetics (p. 134)
  • 5.7.5 Alloying Elements (p. 135)
  • 5.7.6 AISI-SAE Naming Conventions (p. 135)
  • 5.8 Shape Memory Alloys (p. 136)
  • 5.9 Phase Transformation in Biological Systems: Denaturation of Proteins (p. 137)
  • 5.9.1 Background (p. 137)
  • 5.9.2 Protein Conformation (p. 138)
  • 5.10 Application of Phase Diagrams in Making Nanocrystalline Materials (p. 139)
  • 5.11 Phase Diagrams for Dentistry (p. 139)
  • Problems (p. 140)
  • Chapter 6 Ceramics and Composites (p. 143)
  • 6.1 Recipe for Ice Frisbees (p. 143)
  • 6.2 Crystal Structures (p. 143)
  • 6.3 Imperfections (p. 147)
  • 6.3.1 Point Defects (p. 147)
  • 6.3.2 Impurities (p. 147)
  • 6.4 Mechanical Properties (p. 148)
  • 6.4.1 Brittle Fracture of Ceramics (p. 148)
  • 6.4.2 Flexural Strength (p. 149)
  • 6.4.3 Thermal Shock Resistance (p. 150)
  • 6.4.4 Influence of Porosity (p. 152)
  • 6.4.5 Environmental Effects (p. 153)
  • 6.5 Toughening of Ceramics (p. 154)
  • 6.5.1 Transformation Toughening (p. 154)
  • 6.5.2 Fiber or Particulate Reinforcement (p. 155)
  • 6.5.3 Cermets (p. 156)
  • 6.5.4 Surface Modification (p. 156)
  • 6.6 Electrical, Magnetic, Optical, and Thermal Applications (p. 157)
  • 6.6.1 Electrical Insulators (p. 157)
  • 6.6.2 Capacitors (p. 158)
  • 6.6.3 Oxygen Ion Conductors (p. 159)
  • 6.6.4 Data Storage (p. 159)
  • 6.6.5 Optical Fibers (p. 159)
  • 6.6.6 Thermal Insulators (p. 159)
  • 6.6.7 Smart Materials (p. 160)
  • 6.7 Mechanical Properties of Composites (p. 162)
  • 6.8 Biomedical Applications (p. 163)
  • Problems (p. 164)
  • Chapter 7 Polymers (p. 167)
  • 7.1 Rubber Band Experiments (p. 167)
  • 7.2 Polyethylene as a Typical Polymer (p. 167)
  • 7.3 Beyond Polyethylene: Polymer Structures (p. 171)
  • 7.3.1 Stereoisomers (p. 171)
  • 7.3.2 Linear Polymers (p. 171)
  • 7.3.3 Branched Polymers (p. 173)
  • 7.3.4 Cross-Linked Polymers (p. 173)
  • 7.3.5 Network Polymers (p. 175)
  • 7.4 Common Polymers and Typical Applications (p. 175)
  • 7.5 Solid Solutions (Copolymers) (p. 175)
  • 7.6 Crystallinity (p. 177)
  • 7.7 Mechanical Properties (p. 178)
  • 7.7.1 Deformation Mechanisms of Semicrystalline Polymers (p. 178)
  • 7.7.1.1 Elastic Deformation (p. 178)
  • 7.7.1.2 Plastic Deformation (p. 179)
  • 7.7.2 Strengthening Strategies (p. 179)
  • 7.8 Crystallization, Melting, and Glass Transition Temperatures (p. 180)
  • 7.8.1 Crystallization (p. 180)
  • 7.8.2 Melting (p. 180)
  • 7.8.3 Glass Transition Temperature (p. 181)
  • 7.9 Rubber Band Mystery Unveiled (p. 181)
  • 7.10 Fire Retardants for Polymers (p. 182)
  • 7.11 Selected Electro-Optical Applications (p. 183)
  • 7.12 Polymer and Life Sciences (p. 184)
  • Problems (p. 184)
  • Chapter 8 Corrosion and Oxidation of Metals and Alloys (p. 187)
  • 8.1 Silverware Cleaning Magic (p. 187)
  • 8.2 Conventional Example of Corrosion (p. 187)
  • 8.3 Electrode Potentials (p. 188)
  • 8.4 Influence of Concentration and Temperature on Electrode Potentials (p. 189)
  • 8.5 Power by Corrosion: The Cu-Zn Battery (p. 190)
  • 8.5.1 Energy and Voltage (p. 191)
  • 8.6 The Hydrogen Fuel Cell (p. 193)
  • 8.7 Rusting of Iron (p. 194)
  • 8.8 Conditions for Corrosion (p. 195)
  • 8.8.1 Composition Difference (p. 195)
  • 8.8.2 Stress (p. 195)
  • 8.8.3 Concentration Difference (p. 197)
  • 8.9 Rate of Corrosion (p. 197)
  • 8.10 Corrosion Control (p. 199)
  • 8.11 Oxidation (p. 200)
  • 8.12 A Few Examples for Thought (p. 202)
  • 8.12.1 Batteries for Electric Vehicles: Energy Capacity Analysis (p. 202)
  • 8.12.2 Carbon Fuel Cells? (p. 203)
  • 8.12.3 Corrosion Concerns for Prosthetic Implants (p. 203)
  • 8.12.4 Corrosion Protection in Hard-Disk Drives (p. 203)
  • 8.12.5 Propulsion by Oxidation (p. 203)
  • 8.13 Common Batteries (p. 204)
  • 8.13.1 Lead-Acid (p. 204)
  • 8.13.2 Alkaline (p. 204)
  • 8.13.3 Ni-Cd (p. 205)
  • 8.13.4 Ni-MH (Metal Hydride) (p. 205)
  • 8.13.5 Lithium Ion (p. 205)
  • Problems (p. 205)
  • Chapter 9 Magnetic Properties (p. 209)
  • 9.1 Flashlight without Batteries (p. 209)
  • 9.2 Tiny Magnets for Data Storage (p. 210)
  • 9.3 Magnetism Fundamentals and Definitions (p. 212)
  • 9.3.1 Magnetic Field (p. 212)
  • 9.3.2 Magnetic Moment and Magnetization (p. 212)
  • 9.3.3 Magnetic Induction or Flux Density (p. 213)
  • 9.3.4 Saturation Magnetization and Force of Attraction (p. 214)
  • 9.4 Diamagnetic and Paramagnetic Materials (p. 215)
  • 9.5 Magnetic Materials: Ferromagnetism and Antiferromagnetism (p. 218)
  • 9.6 Magnetic Materials for Power Generation (p. 219)
  • 9.7 Magnetic Materials for Data Storage (p. 222)
  • 9.8 Magnetostriction (p. 224)
  • 9.9 Medical, Surveying, and Materials Applications (p. 225)
  • 9.9.1 Hunting for Oil and Mineral Deposits (p. 226)
  • 9.9.2 Magnetic Sampling (p. 226)
  • 9.9.3 Alternators (p. 227)
  • 9.10 Magnetic and Force Shields (p. 227)
  • 9.10.1 Magnetic Shields (p. 227)
  • 9.10.2 Force Shields (p. 229)
  • Problems (p. 230)
  • Chapter 10 Thin Films (p. 233)
  • 10.1 Why Thin Rims? (p. 233)
  • 10.2 Deposition of Thin Films (p. 233)
  • 10.2.1 Evaporation (p. 233)
  • 10.2.1.1 Maximum Evaporation Rate and Vapor Pressure (p. 233)
  • 10.2.1.2 Evaporation Sources (p. 235)
  • 10.2.1.3 Evaporation of Alloys (p. 235)
  • 10.2.1.4 Dependence of Deposition Rate on Source-Substrate Distance (p. 237)
  • 10.2.1.5 Deposition Rate Monitors (p. 238)
  • 10.2.1.6 Measurement of Film Thickness (p. 239)
  • 10.2.2 Sputtering (p. 240)
  • 10.2.2.1 Magnetron Sputtering (p. 240)
  • 10.2.2.2 Substrate Bombardment (p. 243)
  • 10.2.2.3 Radio Frequency (RF) Sputtering (p. 245)
  • 10.2.3 Chemical Vapor Deposition (p. 245)
  • 10.2.3.1 Sample Reactions (p. 246)
  • 10.3 Structure and Morphology (p. 247)
  • 10.4 Selected Properties and Applications (p. 248)
  • 10.4.1 Transport Properties (p. 248)
  • 10.4.2 Optical Properties (p. 249)
  • 10.4.2.1 Cosmetic or Decorative Coatings (p. 249)
  • 10.4.2.2 Suppressed Reflectivity (p. 249)
  • 10.4.2.3 Enhanced Reflectivity (p. 251)
  • 10.4.3 Mechanical Properties (p. 253)
  • 10.4.3.1 Hardness (p. 253)
  • 10.4.3.2 Elastic Modulus (p. 255)
  • 10.4.3.3 Intrinsic Stress (p. 256)
  • 10.4.4 Friction and Wear Properties (p. 257)
  • 10.4.4.1 Friction and Wear (p. 257)
  • 10.4.4.2 Wear Mechanisms (p. 259)
  • 10.4.4.3 Archard's Law (p. 260)
  • 10.4.4.4 Wear Rate and Plasticity Index (p. 261)
  • 10.5 Biomedical Applications (p. 263)
  • Appendix Obtaining the Projected Area of Contact in Nanoindentation Experiments (p. 263)
  • Problems (p. 264)
  • Bibliography (p. 267)
  • Index (p. 269)

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Chung (Northwestern Univ.) has made a new contribution to a growing number of introductory books on materials science. This book is designed as a resource for a one-semester course and covers many standard areas of material science: atomic structure and bonding, crystal structure, electrical properties, mechanical properties, phase diagrams, ceramics and composites, metals, and magnetic materials. Unique aspects include a chapter on thin films and a discussion of biomedical applications at the end of most chapters. An anecdote or "experiment" introduces each chapter, which draws in the reader and provides a real-world application. The work's strength resides in its accessible approach to the material. The clear, concise presentation is also to be commended, but its brevity may leave some readers looking for additional information elsewhere. The bibliography is sparse, and the text lacks answers to problem sets provided in each chapter. Recent works covering similar material include James Shackelford's Introduction to Materials Science for Engineers (6th ed., 2005), William Callister's Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction (7th ed., 2007), and The Science and Engineering of Materials (1st ed., CH, Jul'84; 5th ed., 2006) by Donald Askeland and Pradeep Phule. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates; graduate students. D. E. Hubbard University of Missouri--Rolla

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