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Coastal processes Concepts in coastal engineering and their applications to multifarious environments Tomoya Shibayama

By: Shibayama, Tomoya.
Series: Concepts in coastal engineering and their applications to multifarious environments No. 28.Publisher: Estados Unidos World Scientific Publishing 2009Description: xii, 215 p. il., fig. 23 cm.ISBN: 9789812813954.Subject(s): -- Ingeniería costera | -- ingeniería costera - Los libros de textoDDC classification: 532
Contents:
Introduction. - - Review of fundamental fluid mechanics. - - Basic Equations for wave motion (linear wave theory). - - Wave induced physical phenomena. - - Wave transformation. - - Surfzone Dynamics. - - Wind waves. - - Wave induced currents. - - Wave forces on structures. - - Coastal sediment transport. - - Beach erosion and beach accretion. - - Natural disasters in coastal environment.
Scope and content: This book provides us with important concepts in coastal engineerinf, their applications to coastal processes and disaster prevention works. It is designed for graduate students pursuing advanced studies in coastal processes and for engineers and managers of coastal zone management. The first part describes basic concepts of coastal engineering, dealing mainly with wave-induced physical problems in the field of coastal engineering and hydraulics.
List(s) this item appears in: Ingeniería Mecánica
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Item holds
Libro-General Libro-General B. Campus los Cerros
Colección general
Colección general 532 S555 2009 1 Available
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Includes contents and index

Introduction. - - Review of fundamental fluid mechanics. - - Basic Equations for wave motion (linear wave theory). - - Wave induced physical phenomena. - - Wave transformation. - - Surfzone Dynamics. - - Wind waves. - - Wave induced currents. - - Wave forces on structures. - - Coastal sediment transport. - - Beach erosion and beach accretion. - - Natural disasters in coastal environment.

This book provides us with important concepts in coastal engineerinf, their applications to coastal processes and disaster prevention works. It is designed for graduate students pursuing advanced studies in coastal processes and for engineers and managers of coastal zone management. The first part describes basic concepts of coastal engineering, dealing mainly with wave-induced physical problems in the field of coastal engineering and hydraulics.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. v)
  • Preface of Old Edition (p. vii)
  • 1 Introduction (p. 1)
  • 1.1 Three Examples of Japanese Experience of Coastal Environment Change Due to Construction Works (p. 3)
  • 1.1.1 Ookozu channel for flood control of the Shinano River (p. 3)
  • 1.1.2 Reclamation work in Tokyo Bay (p. 5)
  • 1.1.3 Coastal protection works in Suruga Bay (p. 8)
  • 1.2 General View of River Sediment Supply to Coastal Area over the World (p. 9)
  • 2 Review of Fundamental Fluid Mechanics (p. 13)
  • 2.1 Brief History of Fluid Mechanic (p. 13)
  • 2.2 Brief Review of Vector Analysis (p. 14)
  • 2.2.1 Introduction of vector and scalar operators (p. 14)
  • 2.2.2 The physical meaning of rotation (p. 15)
  • 2.3 Conservation Laws of Fluid Mechanics (p. 17)
  • 2.3.1 Mass conservation (p. 17)
  • 2.3.2 Momentum conservation (p. 19)
  • 2.3.3 Energy conservation (p. 23)
  • 2.4 Irrotational Flow of Inviscid Fluid (p. 24)
  • 2.4.1 Velocity potential (p. 24)
  • 2.4.2 Stream function (p. 25)
  • 2.4.3 Complex potential (p. 26)
  • 3 Basic Equations for Wave Motion (Linear Wave Theory) (p. 31)
  • 3.1 Basic Equations (p. 31)
  • 3.2 Linear Wave Theory (p. 35)
  • 4 Wave Induced Physical Phenomena (p. 43)
  • 4.1 Mass Transport Velocity (p. 43)
  • 4.2 The Bottom Boundary Layer (p. 46)
  • 4.2.1 Formulation (p. 46)
  • 4.2.2 Solution of the linearized boundary layer equation (p. 48)
  • 4.2.3 The bottom shear stress (p. 50)
  • 5 Wave Transformation (p. 53)
  • 5.1 Wave Shoaling (p. 53)
  • 5.2 Wave Breaking (p. 55)
  • 5.3 Wave Reflection and Transmission (p. 58)
  • 5.4 Wave Refraction (p. 58)
  • 5.5 Wave Diffraction (p. 62)
  • 5.6 Mild Slope Equation (p. 64)
  • 5.7 Wave Field Calculation by Boussinesq Equations (p. 66)
  • 5.8 Examination of Breaker Height Formula (p. 69)
  • 5.8.1 Introduction (p. 69)
  • 5.8.2 Existing breaker height formulas (p. 69)
  • 5.9 Energy Dissipation of Breaking Waves (p. 73)
  • 5.9.1 Energy dissipation for regular waves (p. 73)
  • 5.9.2 Energy dissipation for irregular waves (p. 75)
  • 6 Surfzone Dynamics (p. 83)
  • 6.1 General View of Surfzone Dynamics (p. 83)
  • 6.2 Numerical Model of Surfzone Velocity Field (p. 86)
  • 6.2.1 Hydrodynamic model (p. 86)
  • 6.2.2 Numerical formulation (p. 88)
  • 6.3 A Three-Dimensional Large Eddy Simulation (p. 91)
  • 6.3.1 Methodology (p. 91)
  • 6.3.2 Numerical results (p. 94)
  • 7 Wind Waves (p. 99)
  • 7.1 Wind Generated Waves (p. 99)
  • 7.1.1 Individual wave statistics (p. 100)
  • 7.1.2 Energy spectrum (p. 101)
  • 7.2 Wave Forecasting (p. 104)
  • 8 Wave Induced Currents (p. 109)
  • 8.1 Currents in Nearshore Field (p. 109)
  • 8.2 Radiation Stress (p. 110)
  • 8.2.1 The concept of radiation stress (p. 110)
  • 8.2.2 Wave set-up and set-down (p. 111)
  • 8.3 Nearshore Current System (p. 114)
  • 8.3.1 Longshore current velocity distribution (p. 114)
  • 8.3.2 Nearshore circulation (p. 116)
  • 8.4 Undertow Profile (p. 120)
  • 8.4.1 Governing equations (p. 120)
  • 8.4.2 Vertical distribution of shear stress and eddy viscosity coefficient (p. 120)
  • 8.4.3 Mean velocity (p. 121)
  • 8.4.4 Comparison with experiments (p. 122)
  • 9 Wave Forces on Structures (p. 125)
  • 9.1 Breakwater (p. 125)
  • 9.2 Forces on Cylinder (p. 127)
  • 9.3 Breaking Wave Pressure (p. 128)
  • 9.4 Breaking Impact Pressure on Vertical Breakwater (p. 133)
  • 9.5 Caisson Displacement (p. 137)
  • 10 Coastal Sediment Transport (p. 143)
  • 10.1 Sand Transport (p. 143)
  • 10.1.1 General description (p. 143)
  • 10.1.2 Cross-shore transport formula (p. 147)
  • 10.1.3 Longshore transport formula (p. 150)
  • 10.1.4 Initiation of sand transport (p. 151)
  • 10.1.5 Suspended sediment concentration in and outside the surf zone (p. 152)
  • 10.2 Modelling of Time-Dependent Sand Transport at the Bottom Boundary Layer (p. 157)
  • 10.2.1 The turbulent convection-diffusion equation for the sand concentration field (p. 157)
  • 10.2.2 Formulation of boundary conditions (p. 159)
  • 10.2.3 Sand concentration within the bottom boundary layer-comparison with laboratory data (p. 161)
  • 10.3 Mud Transport (p. 164)
  • 10.3.1 Mud behavior in coastal area (p. 164)
  • 10.3.2 Cross-shore mud transport and beach deformation (p. 167)
  • 11 Beach Erosion and Beach Accretion (p. 177)
  • 11.1 Cases in Developing Countries (p. 177)
  • 11.1.1 General trend-Japan model (p. 177)
  • 11.1.2 The case of Thailand (p. 179)
  • 11.1.3 The case of Vietnam (p. 179)
  • 11.1.4 Discussions (p. 182)
  • 11.2 Sediment Production in River Basin and River Sediment Transport to Coasts (p. 183)
  • 11.2.1 Introduction (p. 184)
  • 11.2.2 Methodology (p. 184)
  • 11.2.3 River profile change model (p. 187)
  • 11.2.4 Sediment transport (p. 190)
  • 11.2.5 Sediment evaluation (p. 192)
  • 12 Natural Disasters in Coastal Environment (p. 197)
  • 12.1 Storm Surge (p. 198)
  • 12.1.1 Basic mechanism (p. 198)
  • 12.1.2 Numerical simulation (p. 199)
  • 12.2 Tsunami (p. 200)
  • 12.3 Case Study, Indian Ocean Tsunami (2004) (p. 202)
  • 12.3.1 Surveys in Sri Lanka (p. 202)
  • 12.3.2 Surveys in Indonesia (p. 205)
  • 12.3.3 Tsunami disaster prevention (p. 205)
  • Subject Index (p. 207)
  • Author Index (p. 213)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Tomoya Shibayama is a Professor of Civil Engineering at Yokohama National University, Japan. He received his Doctorate degree in Engineering from the University of Tokyo. Formerly, he was an Associate Professor at the University of Tokyo and at Asian Institute of Technology. He has long experiences of survey of coastal processes and coastal disasters in developing countries including Asia and Africa. Presently he serves as the editor-in-chief of Coastal Engineering Journal (CEJ).

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