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Building structures James Ambrose, Patrick Tripeny

By: Ambrose, James.
Contributor(s): Tripeny, Patrick.
Publisher: New Jersey John Wiley & Sons 2012Edition: 3rd ed.Description: xv,528 p. il., fig. 28 cm.ISBN: 9780470542606.Subject(s): Tecnología | Tecnología e ingeniería | Diseño estructura | Análisis estructural (Ingeniería)DDC classification: 624.17
Contents:
Basic concepts. - - Investigation of structures. - - Strucural elements. - - Wood structures. - - Steel structures. - - Concrete structures. - - Masonry structures. - - Building foundations and site structures. - - Lateral-force effects. - - Building structures desing examples.
Scope and content: Structural desing is an essential element of the building process, yet one of the most difficult to learn. While structural engineers do the detailed consulting work for a building project, architects need to know enough structural theory and analysis to design a building. Most text on structures for architects focus narrowly on the mathematical analysis of isolated structural components, yet building structures looks at the general concepts with selected computations to understand the role of the structure as a building subsystem-without the complicated mathematics.
List(s) this item appears in: Ingeniería Mecánica
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Item holds
Libro-General Libro-General B. Campus los Cerros
Colección general
Colección general 624.17 A496 3rd ed. 2012 1 Available
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

This new edition continues its legacy as the reference of choice for architects studying contemporary issues and design practices for building structures by taking a conceptual approach that foregos complicated mathematics. Looking at the role of the structure as a building subsystem, it offers the fundamentals of computational methods for design of wood, steel, and reinforced concrete structures, along with new material such as discussion of the LRFD method of design. Profusely illustrated with new case studies, this go-to guide is perfect for non-engineers to understand and visualize structural design.

Includes appendix A. Properties of sections. - -appendix B. Glossary. - - appendix C. Exercise problems. - - Appendix D. Study aids., contents and index

Basic concepts. - - Investigation of structures. - - Strucural elements. - - Wood structures. - - Steel structures. - - Concrete structures. - - Masonry structures. - - Building foundations and site structures. - - Lateral-force effects. - - Building structures desing examples.

Structural desing is an essential element of the building process, yet one of the most difficult to learn. While structural engineers do the detailed consulting work for a building project, architects need to know enough structural theory and analysis to design a building. Most text on structures for architects focus narrowly on the mathematical analysis of isolated structural components, yet building structures looks at the general concepts with selected computations to understand the role of the structure as a building subsystem-without the complicated mathematics.

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. ix)
  • Introduction (p. xi)
  • 1 Basic Concepts (p. 1)
  • 1.1 Basic Concerns (p. 1)
  • 1.2 Architectural Considerations (p. 3)
  • 1.3 Structural Functions (p. 12)
  • 1.4 Structural Materials (p. 18)
  • 1.5 Structural Systems (p. 21)
  • 2 Investigation of Structures (p. 39)
  • 2.1 Introduction to Structural Investigation (p. 39)
  • 2.2 Static Forces (p. 41)
  • 2.3 Stresses and Strains (p. 56)
  • 2.4 Special Topics (p. 63)
  • 2.5 Dynamic Behavior (p. 75)
  • 3 Structural Elements (p. 80)
  • 3.1 Beams (p. 80)
  • 3.2 Tension Elements (p. 88)
  • 3.3 Compression Elements (p. 93)
  • 3.4 Trusses (p. 99)
  • 3.5 Rigid Frames (p. 104)
  • 3.6 Special Structures (p. 112)
  • 4 Wood Structures (p. 114)
  • 4.1 General Concerns forWood (p. 114)
  • 4.2 Wood Products and Systems (p. 117)
  • 4.3 Design Data for Structural Lumber (p. 124)
  • 4.4 Wood-Spanning Systems (p. 126)
  • 4.5 Wood Trusses (p. 134)
  • 4.6 Wood Columns (p. 139)
  • 4.7 Fasteners and Connections forWood (p. 147)
  • 5 Steel Structures (p. 153)
  • 5.1 General Concerns for Steel (p. 153)
  • 5.2 Steel Beams, Joists, and Decks (p. 158)
  • 5.3 Steel Columns (p. 187)
  • 5.4 Bolted Connections for Steel Structures (p. 196)
  • 5.5 Steel Trusses (p. 202)
  • 6 Concrete Structures (p. 203)
  • 6.1 General Concerns for Concrete (p. 203)
  • 6.2 Reinforced Concrete Flexural Members (p. 211)
  • 6.3 Concrete Columns (p. 238)
  • 6.4 Concrete Foundations (p. 247)
  • 7 Masonry Structures (p. 259)
  • 7.1 General Concerns for Masonry (p. 259)
  • 7.2 StructuralMasonry (p. 262)
  • 7.3 Masonry with Concrete Units (p. 267)
  • 7.4 Form and Classification of Compression Elements (p. 270)
  • 7.5 Brick Masonry (p. 271)
  • 7.6 Miscellaneous Masonry Construction (p. 276)
  • 7.7 Adobe Construction (p. 279)
  • 7.8 Hollow Clay Tile (p. 279)
  • 8 Building Foundations and Site Structures (p. 281)
  • 8.1 General Considerations (p. 281)
  • 8.2 Soil Properties and Foundation Behavior (p. 283)
  • 8.3 Shallow Bearing Foundations (p. 293)
  • 8.4 Elements of Foundation Systems (p. 298)
  • 8.5 Deep Foundations (p. 304)
  • 8.6 Special Problems and Construction (p. 308)
  • 9 Lateral-Force Effects (p. 316)
  • 9.1 General Considerations for Lateral Effects (p. 316)
  • 9.2 Wind Effects on Buildings (p. 335)
  • 9.3 Earthquake Effects on Buildings (p. 341)
  • 9.4 Elements of Lateral Resistive Systems (p. 350)
  • 10 Building Structures Design Examples (p. 381)
  • 10.1 General Concerns for Structural Design (p. 381)
  • 10.2 Building One (p. 392)
  • 10.3 Building Two (p. 399)
  • 10.4 Building Three (p. 410)
  • 10.5 Building Four (p. 414)
  • 10.6 Building Five (p. 416)
  • 10.7 Building Six (p. 418)
  • 10.8 Building Seven (p. 430)
  • 10.9 Building Eight (p. 455)
  • 10.10 Building Nine (p. 458)
  • Appendix A Properties of Sections (p. 468)
  • Appendix B Glossary (p. 483)
  • Appendix C Exercise Problems (p. 489)
  • Appendix D Study Aids (p. 504)
  • References (p. 519)
  • Index (p. 521)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James Ambrose is Editor of the Parker/Ambrose Series of Simplified Design Guides. He practiced as an architect in California and Illinois and as a structural engineer in Illinois. He was a professor of architecture at the University of Southern California.

Patrick Tripeny is an Associate Professor, former director of the School of Architecture, and the current Director of the Center for Teaching and Learning Excellence at the University of Utah. He is a licensed architect in California. He has been the recipient of a number of teaching awards at the local and national level for his work in teaching structures and design. With James Ambrose, he is the coauthor of Simplified Engineering for Architects and Builders, Eleventh Edition; Simplified Design of Steel Structures, Eighth Edition; Simplified Design of Concrete Structures, Eighth Edition ; and Simplified Design of Wood Structures, Sixth Edition , all published by Wiley.

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