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2005 state of the future Jerome C. Glenn, Theodore J. Gordon

By: Glenn, Jerome C.
Contributor(s): Gordon, Theodore J.
Publisher: Washington, D.C. American Council for the United Nations University 2005Description: 101 p. il., figras., mapas., tabls. 28 cm 1 CD ROM.ISBN: 9780972205146.Subject(s): Cambios globales | Organizacion internacionalDDC classification: 501.12
Partial contents:
Global challenges. - - State of the future index. - - Future ethical issues. - - Nanotechnology: future military enviromental health considerations. - - Emerging enviromental security issues.
Scope and content: The 2005 State of the Future is the ninth in an annual series of global “report cards on the future.” Combination of 100-page paperback of research summaries/conclusions and 3,800-page CD containing cumulative Millennium Project research since 1996 and an annotated bibliography of over 600 scenario sets. The 2005 State of the Future is a unique resource for understanding global change and strategies to improve the human condition. It is used as a text in universities around the world, and also as key input to corporate strategic planners and government policymakers. This guide to the future distills the collective intelligence of nearly 2,000 leading minds in more than 50 countries who work for governments, corporations, NGOs, universities, and international organizations. For example, the annual take of organized crime is more than twice that of all military budgets worldwide... the views of woman and men on future ethical issues are strikingly similar around the world…the high technology and low wages of China and India will result in their becoming giants of world trade, which should force the developing world to rethink its trade-led economic growth strategies…with the advent of the “24-7 always on” globalized world of ubiquitous computing, we will be making many more decisions per day, constantly changing our own and others’ schedules and priorities…a worldwide race to connect everything not yet connected is just beginning... conventional military force has little effect in combating the asymmetrical and intrastate warfare as the boundaries between war, civil unrest, terrorism, and crime become increasingly blurred… more casualties are caused at the hands of men to women then between warring parties... in the best case scenario, China’s water situation does not start to improve for another 10 to 15 years, which is now the key impediment to its growth and could lead to future mass migrations… dramatic increases in collective human-machine intelligence are possible within 25 years. It is also possible that within the same time frame single individuals acting alone might create and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD)… conducting regional water negotiations in the Middle East is the best way to build confidence that peace is possible in the region.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Vol info Copy number Status Date due Item holds
Libro-General Libro-General B. Posgrados
Colección general
Colección general 501.12 G558 2005 1 Available
Multimedia Multimedia B. Posgrados
En Depósito
Colección general CD 501.12 G558 2005 1 Available
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Include appendix. - - Appendix. Millenium project participants demographics

Global challenges. - - State of the future index. - - Future ethical issues. - - Nanotechnology: future military enviromental health considerations. - - Emerging enviromental security issues.

The 2005 State of the Future is the ninth in an annual series of global “report cards on the future.” Combination of 100-page paperback of research summaries/conclusions and 3,800-page CD containing cumulative Millennium Project research since 1996 and an annotated bibliography of over 600 scenario sets. The 2005 State of the Future is a unique resource for understanding global change and strategies to improve the human condition. It is used as a text in universities around the world, and also as key input to corporate strategic planners and government policymakers. This guide to the future distills the collective intelligence of nearly 2,000 leading minds in more than 50 countries who work for governments, corporations, NGOs, universities, and international organizations. For example, the annual take of organized crime is more than twice that of all military budgets worldwide... the views of woman and men on future ethical issues are strikingly similar around the world…the high technology and low wages of China and India will result in their becoming giants of world trade, which should force the developing world to rethink its trade-led economic growth strategies…with the advent of the “24-7 always on” globalized world of ubiquitous computing, we will be making many more decisions per day, constantly changing our own and others’ schedules and priorities…a worldwide race to connect everything not yet connected is just beginning... conventional military force has little effect in combating the asymmetrical and intrastate warfare as the boundaries between war, civil unrest, terrorism, and crime become increasingly blurred… more casualties are caused at the hands of men to women then between warring parties... in the best case scenario, China’s water situation does not start to improve for another 10 to 15 years, which is now the key impediment to its growth and could lead to future mass migrations… dramatic increases in collective human-machine intelligence are possible within 25 years. It is also possible that within the same time frame single individuals acting alone might create and use weapons of mass destruction (WMD)… conducting regional water negotiations in the Middle East is the best way to build confidence that peace is possible in the region.

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