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An introduction to petroleum technology, economics and politics James G. Speight

By: Speight, James G.
Publisher: Salem, MA Wiley c2011Description: xi, 320 p il., figras. 24 cm.ISBN: 9781118012994.Subject(s): Petroleo -- Comercio | Industria del PetróleoDDC classification: 338.2728
Partial contents:
History and terminology of crude oil. - - Origin and occurrence of oil. - - Exploration, recovery, and transportation. - - Crude oil classification and benchmarks. - - The petroleum culture. - - Oil prices. - - The crude oil market.Oil supply. - - The future.
Summary: There is only one substance known to mankind that can cause wars, influence global economies, and make entire countries rich: petroleum. One teaspoon of the stuff carries enough energy to power a ton truck up a hill. It's in the news every single day, it influences our lives in ways that we cannot fathom, and it is the most important commodity in the world. But how much does the average person, even the average engineer, know about it? This book describes the petroleum industry, in easy-to-understand language, for both the layperson and engineer alike. From the economics of searching for oil and gas to the pitfalls of drilling and production, getting it out of the ground, into pipelines, into refineries, and, finally, into your gas tank, this book covers the petroleum industry like no other treatment before. There is coverage of pricing and the economics of this very important resource, as well, which is useful not only to engineers, but to economists and, really, anyone who uses it. "This book describes the petroleum industry in easy-to-understand language for both the layperson and engineer alike. From the economics of searching for oil and gas, getting it out of the ground, into pipelines, into refineries, and, finally, into your gas tank, this book covers the petroleum industry like no other treatment before
List(s) this item appears in: Ingeniería de Petróleos
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Enhanced descriptions from Syndetics:

The perfect primer for both the layperson and the engineer, for the new hire and the old hand, describing, in easy-to-understand language, one of the biggest and most lucrative industries in the world.

There is only one substance known to mankind that can cause wars, influence global economies, and make entire countries rich: petroleum. One teaspoon of the stuff carries enough energy to power a ton truck up a hill. It′s in the news every single day, it influences our lives in ways that we cannot fathom, and it is the most important commodity in the world. But how much does the average person, even the average engineer, know about it?

This book describes the petroleum industry, in easy-to-understand language, for both the layperson and engineer alike. From the economics of searching for oil and gas to the pitfalls of drilling and production, getting it out of the ground, into pipelines, into refineries, and, finally, into your gas tank, this book covers the petroleum industry like no other treatment before. There is coverage of pricing and the economics of this very important resource, as well, which is useful not only to engineers, but to economists and, really, anyone who uses it.

From jet fuel to gasoline to natural gas and plastics, petroleum is one of the integral products of our lives. We are practically bathed it in from birth, our food is protected by it, and it even has healing properties. Learn all about this incredible substance and its fascinating history and highly debated future.

An Introduction to Petroleum Technology, Economics, and Politics :

Gives a thorough summary of the petroleum and natural gas industry, from prospect to production to pipeline New technologies, such as directional and underbalanced drilling, are covered, in easy-to-understand language Useful not only for newcomers and laypersons, but for engineers and students, particularly those for whom English is a second language Examines the basics of pricing and valuation

Incluye referencias bibliográficas, glossary e índice

History and terminology of crude oil. - - Origin and occurrence of oil. - - Exploration, recovery, and transportation. - - Crude oil classification and benchmarks. - - The petroleum culture. - - Oil prices. - - The crude oil market.Oil supply. - - The future.

There is only one substance known to mankind that can cause wars, influence global economies, and make entire countries rich: petroleum. One teaspoon of the stuff carries enough energy to power a ton truck up a hill. It's in the news every single day, it influences our lives in ways that we cannot fathom, and it is the most important commodity in the world. But how much does the average person, even the average engineer, know about it? This book describes the petroleum industry, in easy-to-understand language, for both the layperson and engineer alike. From the economics of searching for oil and gas to the pitfalls of drilling and production, getting it out of the ground, into pipelines, into refineries, and, finally, into your gas tank, this book covers the petroleum industry like no other treatment before. There is coverage of pricing and the economics of this very important resource, as well, which is useful not only to engineers, but to economists and, really, anyone who uses it. "This book describes the petroleum industry in easy-to-understand language for both the layperson and engineer alike. From the economics of searching for oil and gas, getting it out of the ground, into pipelines, into refineries, and, finally, into your gas tank, this book covers the petroleum industry like no other treatment before

Table of contents provided by Syndetics

  • Preface (p. ix)
  • 1 History and Terminology of Crude Oil (p. 1)
  • 1.1 Historical Perspectives (p. 3)
  • 1.2 Modern Perspectives (p. 14)
  • 1.3 Oil Companies (p. 15)
  • 1.4 Definitions and Terminology (p. 17)
  • 1.4.1 Petroleum (p. 21)
  • 1.4.2 Natural Gas (p. 23)
  • 1.4.3 Heavy Oil (p. 25)
  • 1.4.4 Tar Sand Bitumen (p. 26)
  • 1.5 References (p. 28)
  • 2 Origin and Occurrence of Oil (p. 31)
  • 2.1 The Formation of Oil (p. 35)
  • 2.2 Reservoirs (p. 36)
  • 2.2.1 Reservoir Structure (p. 36)
  • 2.2.2 Accumulation in Reservoirs (p. 38)
  • 2.2.3 Distribution of Fluids in the Reservoir (p. 39)
  • 2.2.4 Migration of Reservoir Fluids (p. 41)
  • 2.2.5 Transformation of Petroleum in the Reservoir (p. 42)
  • 2.2.6 Relationship of Petroleum Composition and Properties
  • 2.3 Reservoir Classification (p. 45)
  • 2.4 Reservoir Evaluation (p. 49)
  • 2.4.1 Depletable and Renewable Resources (p. 49)
  • 2.4.2 Development of Resources (p. 50)
  • 2.4.3 New Evaluation Technology (p. 51)
  • 2.5 Estimation of Reserves in Place (p. 52)
  • 2.6 Reserves (p. 55)
  • 2.6.1 Conventional Petroleum (p. 56)
  • 2.6.2 Natural Gas (p. 57)
  • 2.6.3 Heavy Oil (p. 58)
  • 2.6.4 Tar Sand Bitumen (p. 59)
  • 2.7 References (p. 62)
  • 3 Exploration, Recovery, and Transportation (p. 65)
  • 3.1 Exploration (p. 66)
  • 3.2 Drilling (p. 70)
  • 3.2.1 Preparing to Drill (p. 70)
  • 3.2.2 The Drilling Rig (p. 71)
  • 3.2.3 Drilling (p. 72)
  • 3.2.4 Well Completion (p. 73)
  • 3.3 Recovery (p. 75)
  • 3.3.1 Primary Recovery (Natural Methods) (p. 77)
  • 3.3.2 Secondary Recovery (p. 79)
  • 3.3.3 Enhanced Oil Recovery (p. 82)
  • 3.4 Bitumen Recovery (p. 86)
  • 3.4.1 Mining Methods (p. 86)
  • 3.4.2 Non-Mining Methods (p. 88)
  • 3.5 Transportation (p. 91)
  • 3.6 Products and Product Quality (p. 97)
  • 3.7 References (p. 100)
  • 4 Crude Oil Classification and Benchmarks (p. 103)
  • 4.1 Crude Oil Classification (p. 105)
  • 4.1.1 Classification as a Hydrocarbon Resource (p. 107)
  • 4.1.2 Classification by Chemical Composition (p. 107)
  • 4.1.3 Density and API Gravity (p. 109)
  • 4.1.4 Viscosity (p. 109)
  • 4.1.5 UOP Characterization Factor (p. 110)
  • 4.1.6 Pour Point (p. 110)
  • 4.1.7 Recovery Method (p. 111)
  • 4.2 Classification of Reserves (p. 111)
  • 4.2.1 SPE Standards (p. 114)
  • 4.2.2 SEC Standards (p. 119)
  • 4.2.3 Russian Standards (p. 122)
  • 4.2.4 Miscellaneous Standards (p. 125)
  • 4.3 Benchmark Crude Oils (p. 126)
  • 4.4 References (p. 132)
  • 5 The Petroleum Culture (p. 135)
  • 5.1 The Petroleum Culture (p. 138)
  • 5.2 Oil in Perspective (p. 138)
  • 5.2.1 History (p. 138)
  • 5.2.2 The Middle East Emerges (p. 140)
  • 5.2.3 Recent History (p. 144)
  • 5.3 The Seven Sisters (p. 145)
  • 5.4 Reserve Estimates (p. 148)
  • 5.4.1 Historical Variation of Reserve Estimates (p. 149)
  • 5.4.2 Patterns of Use (p. 151)
  • 5.4.3 Energy and the Political Costs of Oil (p. 154)
  • 5.4.4 Price Swings (p. 155)
  • 5.5 References (p. 156)
  • 6 Oil Prices (p. 159)
  • 6.1 Oil Price History (p. 161)
  • 6.2 Pricing Strategies (p. 164)
  • 6.3 Oil Price and Analysis (p. 168)
  • 6.4 The Anatomy of Crude Oil Prices (p. 172)
  • 6.5 The Anatomy of Gasoline Prices (p. 175)
  • 6.6 Effect of Refining Capacity (p. 178)
  • 6.6.1 Refinery Types and Crude Slate (p. 179)
  • 6.6.2 U.S. Refining Capacity (p. 182)
  • 6.6.3 World Refining Capacity (p. 182)
  • 6.6.4 Refining and Refinery Economics (p. 184)
  • 6.7 Outlook (p. 187)
  • 6.8 References (p. 191)
  • 7 The Crude Oil Market (p. 193)
  • 7.1 The Crude Oil Market (p. 195)
  • 7.2 Global Oil Consumption (p. 199)
  • 7.3 Refining and The Markets (p. 205)
  • 7.4 Profitability (p. 211)
  • 7.5 References (p. 212)
  • 8 Oil Supply (p. 215)
  • 8.1 Physical Factors (p. 216)
  • 8.2 Technological Factors (p. 220)
  • 8.3 Economic Factors (p. 223)
  • 8.4 Geopolitical Factors (p. 228)
  • 8.5 Peak Oil (p. 231)
  • 8.5.1 Peak Oil Theory (p. 231)
  • 8.5.2 Effects and Consequences of Peak Oil (p. 235)
  • 8.6 The Impact of Heavy Oil and Tar Sand Bitumen (p. 237)
  • 8.7 References (p. 242)
  • 9 The Future (p. 245)
  • 9.1 Undiscovered Oil (p. 249)
  • 9.2 Coal (p. 252)
  • 9.3 Oil Shale (p. 255)
  • 9.4 Liquids from Biomass (p. 260)
  • 9.5 Energy Independence (p. 264)
  • 9.6 Energy Security (p. 270)
  • 9.7 References (p. 275)
  • Conversion Factors (p. 281)
  • Glossary (p. 283)
  • Index (p. 311)

Author notes provided by Syndetics

James G. Speight is a senior fuel consultant and Visiting Professor at the University of Trinidad and Tobago and Adjunct Professor of Chemical and Fuels Engineering at the University of Utah, USA. He is recognized internationally as an expert in the characterization, properties, and processing of conventional and synthetic fuels and as a chemist with more than 35 years of experience in the process industries. He is the author of numerous books and papers, the senior editor on one journal, and he has won numerous awards and distinctions.

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